An Evolutionary Approach to Understanding the Biology of Invasions: Local Adaptation and General‐Purpose Genotypes in the Weed Verbascum thapsus

An Evolutionary Approach to Understanding the Biology of Invasions: Local Adaptation and... Abstract: The role of evolution in the invasion of non‐native species has important implications for conservation, weed science, risk assessment, and policy. In this paper we first discuss why an evolutionary perspective can be helpful and outline a range of potentially useful approaches from population biology and ecological genetics. As a case study, we then ask how adaptation and genetic structure may promote or constrain the expansion of an invasive weed, Verbascum thapsus, into high elevations in the Sierra Nevada of California. We used growth‐chamber and common‐garden experiments to assay a range of morphological and physiological traits that could influence plant fitness at high elevation. There was a significant relationship between elevation and leaf size and reflectance above 800 m, although we found no relationship between elevation and most other traits ( growth rate in warm or cool temperatures, freezing tolerance when grown in warm or cool temperatures, leaf number, rosette morphology, plant height ). We did see marked genetic differentiation among populations, possibly reflecting founder effects and a history of genetic drift. When we partitioned the phenotypic variance, there was almost no variation among maternal families within populations, limiting the potential for selection to act. The majority of the variance for all traits was among individuals within families, suggesting that environmental conditions strongly influenced the phenotype. Overall, the increasing success of V. thapsus at high elevations appears to conform more to Baker's concept of a general‐purpose genotype than to invasion by rapid adaptation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

An Evolutionary Approach to Understanding the Biology of Invasions: Local Adaptation and General‐Purpose Genotypes in the Weed Verbascum thapsus

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/an-evolutionary-approach-to-understanding-the-biology-of-invasions-eD3GVYHj35
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.2003.02019.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: The role of evolution in the invasion of non‐native species has important implications for conservation, weed science, risk assessment, and policy. In this paper we first discuss why an evolutionary perspective can be helpful and outline a range of potentially useful approaches from population biology and ecological genetics. As a case study, we then ask how adaptation and genetic structure may promote or constrain the expansion of an invasive weed, Verbascum thapsus, into high elevations in the Sierra Nevada of California. We used growth‐chamber and common‐garden experiments to assay a range of morphological and physiological traits that could influence plant fitness at high elevation. There was a significant relationship between elevation and leaf size and reflectance above 800 m, although we found no relationship between elevation and most other traits ( growth rate in warm or cool temperatures, freezing tolerance when grown in warm or cool temperatures, leaf number, rosette morphology, plant height ). We did see marked genetic differentiation among populations, possibly reflecting founder effects and a history of genetic drift. When we partitioned the phenotypic variance, there was almost no variation among maternal families within populations, limiting the potential for selection to act. The majority of the variance for all traits was among individuals within families, suggesting that environmental conditions strongly influenced the phenotype. Overall, the increasing success of V. thapsus at high elevations appears to conform more to Baker's concept of a general‐purpose genotype than to invasion by rapid adaptation.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2003

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off