AN EVALUATION OF GENERIC TEAMWORK SKILLS TRAINING WITH ACTION TEAMS: EFFECTS ON COGNITIVE AND SKILL‐BASED OUTCOMES

AN EVALUATION OF GENERIC TEAMWORK SKILLS TRAINING WITH ACTION TEAMS: EFFECTS ON COGNITIVE AND... This study evaluated the utility of generic teamwork skills training for enhancing the effectiveness of action teams. Results from 65 4‐person action teams working on an interdependent command and control simulator revealed that generic teamwork skills training had a significant and positive impact on both cognitive and skill‐based outcomes. Trained team members evidenced higher levels of declarative knowledge regarding teamwork competencies and demonstrated greater proficiency in the areas of planning and task coordination, collaborative problem‐solving, and communication. Furthermore, results indicated that cognitive and skill based outcomes were interrelated. Team members' declarative knowledge regarding teamwork competencies positively affected planning and task coordination, collaborative problem solving, and communication skills. However, we found that the effects of declarative knowledge differed across team members depending on their roles and responsibilities. The team benefited the most from the knowledge held by the team member who occupied the most critical position in the workflow. Implications of these findings for future research and practice are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

AN EVALUATION OF GENERIC TEAMWORK SKILLS TRAINING WITH ACTION TEAMS: EFFECTS ON COGNITIVE AND SKILL‐BASED OUTCOMES

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/an-evaluation-of-generic-teamwork-skills-training-with-action-teams-zMmRsj31w0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.2005.00617.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study evaluated the utility of generic teamwork skills training for enhancing the effectiveness of action teams. Results from 65 4‐person action teams working on an interdependent command and control simulator revealed that generic teamwork skills training had a significant and positive impact on both cognitive and skill‐based outcomes. Trained team members evidenced higher levels of declarative knowledge regarding teamwork competencies and demonstrated greater proficiency in the areas of planning and task coordination, collaborative problem‐solving, and communication. Furthermore, results indicated that cognitive and skill based outcomes were interrelated. Team members' declarative knowledge regarding teamwork competencies positively affected planning and task coordination, collaborative problem solving, and communication skills. However, we found that the effects of declarative knowledge differed across team members depending on their roles and responsibilities. The team benefited the most from the knowledge held by the team member who occupied the most critical position in the workflow. Implications of these findings for future research and practice are discussed.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2005

References

  • Acquisition of a cognitive skill
    Anderson, Anderson
  • Adaptive guidance: Enhancing self‐regulation, knowledge, and performance in technology‐based training
    Bell, Bell; Kozlowski, Kozlowski
  • Relations between work team characteristics and effectiveness: A replication and extension
    Campion, Campion; Papper, Papper; Medsker, Medsker
  • Effects of rotated leadership and peer evaluation on the functioning and effectiveness of self‐managed teams: A quasi‐experiment
    Erez, Erez; LePine, LePine; Elms, Elms
  • The effectiveness of an organizational‐level orientation training program in the socialization of new hires
    Klein, Klein; Weaver, Weaver
  • Learning within a learner control training environment: The interactive effects of goal orientation and metacognitive instruction on learning outcomes
    Schmidt, Schmidt; Ford, Ford
  • Training team performance‐related assertiveness
    Smith‐Jentsch, Smith‐Jentsch; Salas, Salas; Baker, Baker

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off