An Environment‐metapopulation Approach to Population Viability Analysis for a Threatened Invertebrate

An Environment‐metapopulation Approach to Population Viability Analysis for a Threatened... Abstract: Most previous population viability analyses of endangered species have focused on large vertebrates: long‐lived species with low rates of population increase, long generation times, and comparatively low habitat specificity. Habitat fragmentation not only reduces the distribution of such species, but reduces population densities to levels at which genetic and demographic constraints threaten population persistence. Many other endangered species, in contrast, are characterized by small body size, high rates of population increase, short generation times, and high habitat specificity. Habitat fragmentation reduces distributions of such species, but within remnant habitats population densities may continue to be high. Population viability analyses for these species — which include many small vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants — must focus on the environmental factors and metapopulation characteristics that determine population persistence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

An Environment‐metapopulation Approach to Population Viability Analysis for a Threatened Invertebrate

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1990.tb00266.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Most previous population viability analyses of endangered species have focused on large vertebrates: long‐lived species with low rates of population increase, long generation times, and comparatively low habitat specificity. Habitat fragmentation not only reduces the distribution of such species, but reduces population densities to levels at which genetic and demographic constraints threaten population persistence. Many other endangered species, in contrast, are characterized by small body size, high rates of population increase, short generation times, and high habitat specificity. Habitat fragmentation reduces distributions of such species, but within remnant habitats population densities may continue to be high. Population viability analyses for these species — which include many small vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants — must focus on the environmental factors and metapopulation characteristics that determine population persistence.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1990

References

  • The ecological web
    Andrewartha, H. G.; Birch, L. C.
  • The location of monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus L.) overwintering colonies in Mexico in relation to topography and climate
    Calvert, W. H.; Brower, C. P.
  • The status of the swallowtail butterfly in Britain
    Dempster, J. P.; King, M. L.; Lakhani, K. H.
  • Rainfall and the interaction of microclimate with larval resources in the population dynamics of checkerspot butterflies (Euphydryas editha) inhabiting serpentine grassland
    Dobkin, D. S.; Olivieri, I.; Ehrlich, P. R.
  • Ecological studies on the large copper butterflies, Lycaena dispar batavus, on Woodwalton Fen NNR, Huntingtonshire
    Duffey, E.
  • A direct assessment of the role of genetic drift in determining allele frequency variation in populations of Euphydras editha
    Mueller, L. E.; Wilcox, B. A.; Ehrlich, P. R.; Murphy, D. D.
  • The Kirby Canyon conservation agreement a model for the resolution of land use conflicts involving threatened invertebrates
    Murphy, D. D.

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