An empirical investigation of the relationship between product involvement and brand commitment

An empirical investigation of the relationship between product involvement and brand commitment Strong brand commitment has often been associated with high levels of involvement. However, empirical evidence supporting the conceptual distinctiveness of the two constructs has been equivocal. The findings of this study indicate that product involvement and brand commitment are not highly related and, indeed, represent unique constructs. Four distinct consumer segments emerged from the data analysis based upon low to high levels of product involvement and weak to strong brand commitment. Furthermore, various differences were revealed among the four groups with respect to product orientations, sources of brand information, and the importance of product attributes. © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology & Marketing Wiley

An empirical investigation of the relationship between product involvement and brand commitment

Psychology & Marketing, Volume 17 (9) – Sep 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
0742-6046
eISSN
1520-6793
DOI
10.1002/1520-6793(200009)17:9<761::AID-MAR2>3.0.CO;2-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Strong brand commitment has often been associated with high levels of involvement. However, empirical evidence supporting the conceptual distinctiveness of the two constructs has been equivocal. The findings of this study indicate that product involvement and brand commitment are not highly related and, indeed, represent unique constructs. Four distinct consumer segments emerged from the data analysis based upon low to high levels of product involvement and weak to strong brand commitment. Furthermore, various differences were revealed among the four groups with respect to product orientations, sources of brand information, and the importance of product attributes. © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Journal

Psychology & MarketingWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2000

References

  • Application of the personal involvement inventory in marketing
    Flynn, Flynn; Goldsmith, Goldsmith
  • Measuring purchase‐decision involvement
    Mittal, Mittal
  • Product class involvement and purchase intent
    Rahtz, Rahtz; Moore, Moore

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