An Empirical Investigation into Factors Relating to the Adoption of Executive Information Systems: An Analysis of EIS for Collaboration and Decision Support *

An Empirical Investigation into Factors Relating to the Adoption of Executive Information... ABSTRACT This study focuses on the organizational adoption of Executive Information Systems (EIS). A distinction is made between two related, complementary EIS capabilities—EIS for collaboration support (EISc) and EIS for decision support (EISd). EISc is relatively standardized and replicable, while EISd has to be developed in situ given the specific characteristics of the user and task. The adoption process is conceptualized as an initial transition from a state of nonadoption to adoption (adoption status) and subsequent internal propagation of the technology (adoption level). Data collected from a national survey are used to test hypotheses between identified contextual variables and the adoption status and adoption level of EISc and EISd. Adopters and nonadopters of both EISc and EISd do not differ in their organization size, suggesting that the traditional paradigm of “EIS as a technology for large firms” is no longer true. Environmental uncertainty is found to promote the transition from a state of nonadoption to adoption of both EISc and EISd while continuing to catalyze the internal propagation of EISd. While no differences are observed in IS department size between adopters and nonadopters of EISc, our results suggest that larger IS departments provide the resource base to explore the less standardized of the two capabilities, EISd. IS support is also found to be critical for the subsequent internal propagation of EISd. Furthermore, the adoption level of both EISc and EISd are found to be promoted by top management support. Implications of these results are discussed for the organizational adoption of EIS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

An Empirical Investigation into Factors Relating to the Adoption of Executive Information Systems: An Analysis of EIS for Collaboration and Decision Support *

Decision Sciences, Volume 28 (4) – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1997.tb01337.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT This study focuses on the organizational adoption of Executive Information Systems (EIS). A distinction is made between two related, complementary EIS capabilities—EIS for collaboration support (EISc) and EIS for decision support (EISd). EISc is relatively standardized and replicable, while EISd has to be developed in situ given the specific characteristics of the user and task. The adoption process is conceptualized as an initial transition from a state of nonadoption to adoption (adoption status) and subsequent internal propagation of the technology (adoption level). Data collected from a national survey are used to test hypotheses between identified contextual variables and the adoption status and adoption level of EISc and EISd. Adopters and nonadopters of both EISc and EISd do not differ in their organization size, suggesting that the traditional paradigm of “EIS as a technology for large firms” is no longer true. Environmental uncertainty is found to promote the transition from a state of nonadoption to adoption of both EISc and EISd while continuing to catalyze the internal propagation of EISd. While no differences are observed in IS department size between adopters and nonadopters of EISc, our results suggest that larger IS departments provide the resource base to explore the less standardized of the two capabilities, EISd. IS support is also found to be critical for the subsequent internal propagation of EISd. Furthermore, the adoption level of both EISc and EISd are found to be promoted by top management support. Implications of these results are discussed for the organizational adoption of EIS.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1997

References

  • Distributed intelligent executive information systems
    Chi, Chi; Turban, Turban
  • EIS adoption, use, and impact: The executive perspective
    Elam, Elam; Leidner, Leidner
  • Innovation in conservative and entrepreneurial firms: Two models of strategic momentum
    Miller, Miller; Friesen, Friesen
  • What does it take for successful executive information systems
    Rainer, Rainer; Watson, Watson
  • Decision processes for developing strategic applications of information systems: A contingency approach
    Sabherwal, Sabherwal; King, King
  • Construct measurement in information systems research: An illustration in strategic systems
    Sethi, Sethi; King, King
  • Using EIS to respond to dynamic business conditions
    Volonino, Volonino; Watson, Watson; Robinson, Robinson
  • Determining information requirements of an EIS
    Watson, Watson; Frolick, Frolick
  • Development practices for executive information systems: Findings of a field study
    Watson, Watson; Watson, Watson; Singh, Singh; Holmes, Holmes

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