AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY OF CELL DEGENERATION IN CHICK EMBRYO SPINAL GANGLIA

AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY OF CELL DEGENERATION IN CHICK EMBRYO SPINAL GANGLIA An electron microscopic study of cell degeneration in chick embryo spinal ganglia Cell degeneration which normally occurs during development was studied under the electron microscope in thoracic spinal ganglia of chicken embryos. Cells undergoing degeneration were often identified as primitive neuroblasts or transitional cells between the primitive and intermediate neuroblast, and sometimes as intermediate neuroblasts. Degeneration seems to begin with nuclear alterations (chromatin condensation and segregation of the nucleolar components) and ribosomal changes (polysomal disaggregation, and displacement of many membrane‐associated ribosomes). Soon the Golgi complex is no longer recognizable. Successively, large masses of finely granular material become prominent in the nucleus, the nuclear envelope breaks down, many mitochondria appear altered, many vacuoles with clear contents become evident, and ribosome crystals appear. At the end of the process the degenerated cell appears as a shrunken mass of granular debris and membrane fragments. Some neuroblastic processes contain clumped filaments and microtubules and/or polymorphic dense bodies. These structural changes are not unique to this degenerative process, but closely resemble those following other types of injuries of the nerve cell. A drastic reduction in the nuclear synthesis of RNA, and a profound impairment in protein synthesis are probably the main biochemical events which occur in these degenerating cells. Degeneration, which probably affects the neuroblasts which fail to establish appropriate connections with the periphery, seems to be one of the major factors controlling cell number in the spinal ganglia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuropathology & Applied Neurobiology Wiley

AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY OF CELL DEGENERATION IN CHICK EMBRYO SPINAL GANGLIA

Neuropathology & Applied Neurobiology, Volume 2 (4) – Jul 1, 1976

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-1846
eISSN
1365-2990
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2990.1976.tb00501.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An electron microscopic study of cell degeneration in chick embryo spinal ganglia Cell degeneration which normally occurs during development was studied under the electron microscope in thoracic spinal ganglia of chicken embryos. Cells undergoing degeneration were often identified as primitive neuroblasts or transitional cells between the primitive and intermediate neuroblast, and sometimes as intermediate neuroblasts. Degeneration seems to begin with nuclear alterations (chromatin condensation and segregation of the nucleolar components) and ribosomal changes (polysomal disaggregation, and displacement of many membrane‐associated ribosomes). Soon the Golgi complex is no longer recognizable. Successively, large masses of finely granular material become prominent in the nucleus, the nuclear envelope breaks down, many mitochondria appear altered, many vacuoles with clear contents become evident, and ribosome crystals appear. At the end of the process the degenerated cell appears as a shrunken mass of granular debris and membrane fragments. Some neuroblastic processes contain clumped filaments and microtubules and/or polymorphic dense bodies. These structural changes are not unique to this degenerative process, but closely resemble those following other types of injuries of the nerve cell. A drastic reduction in the nuclear synthesis of RNA, and a profound impairment in protein synthesis are probably the main biochemical events which occur in these degenerating cells. Degeneration, which probably affects the neuroblasts which fail to establish appropriate connections with the periphery, seems to be one of the major factors controlling cell number in the spinal ganglia.

Journal

Neuropathology & Applied NeurobiologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1976

References

  • Lysosomal packaging in differentiating and degenerating anuran lateral motor column neurons
    DECKER, DECKER
  • The effects of bilateral extirpation of the anterior limb rudiments in Amblystoma embryos
    DETWILER, DETWILER
  • Cell death in the embryonic chick spinal cord
    O'CONNOR, O'CONNOR; WYTTENBACH, WYTTENBACH
  • Neuronal perikarya with dispersed, single ribosomes in the visual cortex of Macaca mulatta
    PALAY, PALAY; BILLINGS‐GAGLIARDI, BILLINGS‐GAGLIARDI; CHAN‐PALAY, CHAN‐PALAY
  • The response of ventral horn neurons to axonal transection
    PRICE, PRICE; PORTER, PORTER
  • The use of lead citrate at high pH as an electron‐opaque stain in electron microscopy
    REYNOLDS, REYNOLDS
  • A simplified lead citrate stain for use in electron microscopy
    VENABLE, VENABLE; COGGESHALL, COGGESHALL
  • Transient, focal accumulation of axonal mitochondria during the early stages of wallerian degeneration
    WEBSTER, WEBSTER

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