An assessment of scientific approaches towards species relocations in Australia

An assessment of scientific approaches towards species relocations in Australia Species relocation programmes are increasingly performed with the intention of establishing a self‐sustaining population of threatened or declining native species. However, the use of experimental quantitative approaches in species relocation programmes is still relatively uncommon, despite a number of international studies recommending clear guidelines and standards. This paper evaluates species relocation programmes conducted within Australia to assess how programmes performed in relation to such standards. The search techniques identified 54 species relocation programmes, the majority of which were reintroductions (52%) and supplementations (30%). Only 25 (46%) of the species relocation programmes claimed success, with a lack of effective predator control recognized as contributing to the failure of 14 programmes. There was considerable variation in the quality of species relocation programmes in relation to key features such as whether the programme integrated experimental approaches with testable hypotheses, whether there were explicit statements of criteria for success, whether suitable habitat was identified for the release site and whether long‐term monitoring was conducted. We propose guidelines to improve scientific rigour and success rates of species relocation programmes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Austral Ecology Wiley

An assessment of scientific approaches towards species relocations in Australia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/an-assessment-of-scientific-approaches-towards-species-relocations-in-u2dGl5fEIJ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Ecological Society of Australia
ISSN
1442-9985
eISSN
1442-9993
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02264.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Species relocation programmes are increasingly performed with the intention of establishing a self‐sustaining population of threatened or declining native species. However, the use of experimental quantitative approaches in species relocation programmes is still relatively uncommon, despite a number of international studies recommending clear guidelines and standards. This paper evaluates species relocation programmes conducted within Australia to assess how programmes performed in relation to such standards. The search techniques identified 54 species relocation programmes, the majority of which were reintroductions (52%) and supplementations (30%). Only 25 (46%) of the species relocation programmes claimed success, with a lack of effective predator control recognized as contributing to the failure of 14 programmes. There was considerable variation in the quality of species relocation programmes in relation to key features such as whether the programme integrated experimental approaches with testable hypotheses, whether there were explicit statements of criteria for success, whether suitable habitat was identified for the release site and whether long‐term monitoring was conducted. We propose guidelines to improve scientific rigour and success rates of species relocation programmes.

Journal

Austral EcologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off