An analysis of body image distortions in a nonpatient population

An analysis of body image distortions in a nonpatient population The present study sought to objectively assess body size estimates in subjects not currently undergoing treatment for eating disorders. Two hundred and twenty‐three subjects were asked to rate (a) whether they perceived themselves as underweight, normal weight, or overweight and (b) the number of pounds they felt they were from their ideal weight. These perceptions were then compared to their actual weight. Additionally, subjects were asked to rate their attractiveness, how well they were liked, and how frequently they dated. Results suggest that both overweight males and females significantly underestimated the degree of their obesity, although females were more accurate than males in their ratings. Further, in the normal and underweight groups, females felt they were significantly more overweight than they actually were. Overweight subjects did not differ from either underweight or normal weight subjects on any of the remaining variables. Implication of these results are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Eating Disorders Wiley

An analysis of body image distortions in a nonpatient population

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0276-3478
eISSN
1098-108X
DOI
10.1002/1098-108X(198321)2:2<35::AID-EAT2260020204>3.0.CO;2-Y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study sought to objectively assess body size estimates in subjects not currently undergoing treatment for eating disorders. Two hundred and twenty‐three subjects were asked to rate (a) whether they perceived themselves as underweight, normal weight, or overweight and (b) the number of pounds they felt they were from their ideal weight. These perceptions were then compared to their actual weight. Additionally, subjects were asked to rate their attractiveness, how well they were liked, and how frequently they dated. Results suggest that both overweight males and females significantly underestimated the degree of their obesity, although females were more accurate than males in their ratings. Further, in the normal and underweight groups, females felt they were significantly more overweight than they actually were. Overweight subjects did not differ from either underweight or normal weight subjects on any of the remaining variables. Implication of these results are discussed.

Journal

International Journal of Eating DisordersWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1983

References

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