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An adaptive governance approach to disaster‐related behavioural health services

An adaptive governance approach to disaster‐related behavioural health services This paper explores the provision of disaster‐related behavioural and mental health (DBH) services as a problem of institutional collective action in the United States. This study reviews the challenges that providers have in surmounting multi‐organizational disconnects, unstable professional legitimacy, ambiguous information, and shifting disaster needs in developing a system for delivering DBH services. Based on the adaptive governance framework, it argues that existing protocols such as the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) may be helpful in advancing collective action, but that real progress will depend on a recognition of norms, expectations, and credentials across many spheres—in other words, on the ability of responders to continuously adjust their procedures and administrative boundaries for behavioural health institutions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disasters Wiley

An adaptive governance approach to disaster‐related behavioural health services

Disasters , Volume 36 (3) – Jul 1, 2012

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References (35)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2012 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2012
ISSN
0361-3666
eISSN
1467-7717
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-7717.2011.01262.x
pmid
22066735
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper explores the provision of disaster‐related behavioural and mental health (DBH) services as a problem of institutional collective action in the United States. This study reviews the challenges that providers have in surmounting multi‐organizational disconnects, unstable professional legitimacy, ambiguous information, and shifting disaster needs in developing a system for delivering DBH services. Based on the adaptive governance framework, it argues that existing protocols such as the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) may be helpful in advancing collective action, but that real progress will depend on a recognition of norms, expectations, and credentials across many spheres—in other words, on the ability of responders to continuously adjust their procedures and administrative boundaries for behavioural health institutions.

Journal

DisastersWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2012

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