AMOUNT OF INFORMATION AND PRIMACY‐RECENCY EFFECTS IN RECRUITMENT DECISIONS

AMOUNT OF INFORMATION AND PRIMACY‐RECENCY EFFECTS IN RECRUITMENT DECISIONS RECENT findings of Farr (1973) suggested that recency effects are obtained when subjects make repeated judgments concerning hypothetical job applicants. The information presented last about an applicant had a greater effect upon final interview judgments than information presented early in the simulated interview when the interviewer was required to judge each applicant several times. When only a single judgment was required, the results were less consistent, although a primacy effect was found for one type of decision. Farr’s (1973) results differed from some of the earlier findings of the McGill studies of decision making in the selection interview (Webster, 1964), particularly the research of Springbett (1958). Springbett found a primacy effect for information order in experimental conditions which required that the interviewers make repeated judgments about the applicants. One factor distinguishing the Farr (1973) and Springbett (1958) studies was the amount of information presented about each applicant. In Springbett’s research a relatively large amount of information was presented to the interviewer about each applicant, whereas in Farr’s study only eight items of information per applicant were used. The amount of information available concerning the applicant may moderate whether primacy or recency effects are found. The classic ar- ’ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

AMOUNT OF INFORMATION AND PRIMACY‐RECENCY EFFECTS IN RECRUITMENT DECISIONS

Personnel Psychology, Volume 28 (2) – Jun 1, 1975

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1975.tb01383.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RECENT findings of Farr (1973) suggested that recency effects are obtained when subjects make repeated judgments concerning hypothetical job applicants. The information presented last about an applicant had a greater effect upon final interview judgments than information presented early in the simulated interview when the interviewer was required to judge each applicant several times. When only a single judgment was required, the results were less consistent, although a primacy effect was found for one type of decision. Farr’s (1973) results differed from some of the earlier findings of the McGill studies of decision making in the selection interview (Webster, 1964), particularly the research of Springbett (1958). Springbett found a primacy effect for information order in experimental conditions which required that the interviewers make repeated judgments about the applicants. One factor distinguishing the Farr (1973) and Springbett (1958) studies was the amount of information presented about each applicant. In Springbett’s research a relatively large amount of information was presented to the interviewer about each applicant, whereas in Farr’s study only eight items of information per applicant were used. The amount of information available concerning the applicant may moderate whether primacy or recency effects are found. The classic ar- ’

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1975

References

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