Altered task‐related modulation of long‐range connectivity in children with autism

Altered task‐related modulation of long‐range connectivity in children with autism IntroductionAltered brain connectivity is an often‐replicated finding of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) [Vasa, Mostofsky, & Ewen, ]. The disruption specifically of functional connectivity—defined as temporally coordinated activity of different brain regions—has been associated with a variety of symptoms of ASD, ranging from social‐communicative to motor [Schipul, Keller, & Just, ]. Much of the evidence for altered connectivity in ASD has come from MRI‐based studies of functional and structural connectivity [Schipul et al., ; Vasa et al., ; Wass, ]; comparatively fewer studies have been conducted using EEG and MEG [Vasa et al., ]. M/EEG's greater time resolution than fMRI and direct indexing of neuronal electrical activity allow for better assessment of fast dynamic changes in brain connectivity and differential recording of different frequency bands of oscillatory activity [Siegel, Donner, & Engel, ; Varela, Lachaux, Rodriguez, & Martinerie, ]. Modulations of the power in these oscillations have been extensively linked to cognitive/behavioral function [Buzsáki & Draguhn, ; Klimesch, ; Kopell, Gritton, Whittington, & Kramer, ]. Even within the same cortical region, modulation of different frequencies can be differentially related to distinct tasks [Pfurtscheller, ].Current accounts of ASD‐connectivity suggest decreased long‐range connectivity (“global under‐connectivity”), with most EEG results coming primarily from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley

Altered task‐related modulation of long‐range connectivity in children with autism

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
D.O.I.
10.1002/aur.1858
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionAltered brain connectivity is an often‐replicated finding of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) [Vasa, Mostofsky, & Ewen, ]. The disruption specifically of functional connectivity—defined as temporally coordinated activity of different brain regions—has been associated with a variety of symptoms of ASD, ranging from social‐communicative to motor [Schipul, Keller, & Just, ]. Much of the evidence for altered connectivity in ASD has come from MRI‐based studies of functional and structural connectivity [Schipul et al., ; Vasa et al., ; Wass, ]; comparatively fewer studies have been conducted using EEG and MEG [Vasa et al., ]. M/EEG's greater time resolution than fMRI and direct indexing of neuronal electrical activity allow for better assessment of fast dynamic changes in brain connectivity and differential recording of different frequency bands of oscillatory activity [Siegel, Donner, & Engel, ; Varela, Lachaux, Rodriguez, & Martinerie, ]. Modulations of the power in these oscillations have been extensively linked to cognitive/behavioral function [Buzsáki & Draguhn, ; Klimesch, ; Kopell, Gritton, Whittington, & Kramer, ]. Even within the same cortical region, modulation of different frequencies can be differentially related to distinct tasks [Pfurtscheller, ].Current accounts of ASD‐connectivity suggest decreased long‐range connectivity (“global under‐connectivity”), with most EEG results coming primarily from

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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