Allozyme evidence for reproductively isolated sympatric populations of brown trout Salmo trutta L. in Lough Melvin, Ireland

Allozyme evidence for reproductively isolated sympatric populations of brown trout Salmo trutta... Electrophoretic studies of five polymorphic enzyme loci (G‐3‐PDH‐2, LDH‐I, LDH‐5, PGI‐2, PGI‐3) in brown trout from Lough Melvin in northwestern Ireland have demonstrated that the morphotypes known by the vernacular names of ‘ferox’, ‘gillaroo’ and ‘sonaghen’, are not merely ecophenotypes but represent genetically distinct and reproductively isolated populations. The results suggest that the long life and higher growth potential of ferox trout of this lake, and possibly others, has a genetic basis. These separate demes of brown trout are probably the result of multiple invasions in post‐glacial times of allopatrically derived stocks. Lough Melvin's isolated position and absence of pike, Esox lucius, and large cyprinids have probably contributed to its pristine condition. As such it is one of the few remaining examples of what may once have been a widespread situation in Britain and Ireland. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

Allozyme evidence for reproductively isolated sympatric populations of brown trout Salmo trutta L. in Lough Melvin, Ireland

Journal of Fish Biology, Volume 18 (6) – Jun 1, 1981

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1095-8649.1981.tb03805.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Electrophoretic studies of five polymorphic enzyme loci (G‐3‐PDH‐2, LDH‐I, LDH‐5, PGI‐2, PGI‐3) in brown trout from Lough Melvin in northwestern Ireland have demonstrated that the morphotypes known by the vernacular names of ‘ferox’, ‘gillaroo’ and ‘sonaghen’, are not merely ecophenotypes but represent genetically distinct and reproductively isolated populations. The results suggest that the long life and higher growth potential of ferox trout of this lake, and possibly others, has a genetic basis. These separate demes of brown trout are probably the result of multiple invasions in post‐glacial times of allopatrically derived stocks. Lough Melvin's isolated position and absence of pike, Esox lucius, and large cyprinids have probably contributed to its pristine condition. As such it is one of the few remaining examples of what may once have been a widespread situation in Britain and Ireland.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1981

References

  • Reproductive isolation with little genetic divergence in sympatric populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    Ryman, Ryman; Allendrof, Allendrof; Ståhl, Ståhl
  • Ferox) trout, Salmo trutta L. of Loughs Mask and Corrib
    Went, Went

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