Allometric scaling of maximum population density: a common rule for marine phytoplankton and terrestrial plants

Allometric scaling of maximum population density: a common rule for marine phytoplankton and... A primary goal of macroecology is to identify principles that apply across varied ecosystems and taxonomic groups. Here we show that the allometric relationship observed between maximum abundance and body size for terrestrial plants can be extended to predict maximum population densities of marine phytoplankton. These results imply that the abundance of primary producers is similarly constrained in terrestrial and marine systems by rates of energy supply as dictated by a common allometric scaling law. They also highlight the existence of general mechanisms linking rates of individual metabolism to emergent properties of ecosystems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Letters Wiley

Allometric scaling of maximum population density: a common rule for marine phytoplankton and terrestrial plants

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1461-023X
eISSN
1461-0248
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1461-0248.2002.00364.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A primary goal of macroecology is to identify principles that apply across varied ecosystems and taxonomic groups. Here we show that the allometric relationship observed between maximum abundance and body size for terrestrial plants can be extended to predict maximum population densities of marine phytoplankton. These results imply that the abundance of primary producers is similarly constrained in terrestrial and marine systems by rates of energy supply as dictated by a common allometric scaling law. They also highlight the existence of general mechanisms linking rates of individual metabolism to emergent properties of ecosystems.

Journal

Ecology LettersWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2002

References

  • An upper limit to the abundance of aquatic organisms
    Duarte, Duarte; Agusti, Agusti; Peters, Peters

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