Alcohol binge drinking in early pregnancy and the effect on fetal growth: a cohort study

Alcohol binge drinking in early pregnancy and the effect on fetal growth: a cohort study AbbreviationsCIconfidence intervalKey messageWe found no statistically significant association between alcohol binge drinking, number of binge drinking episodes or timing of binge drinking and birthweight and birth length.IntroductionAlcohol intake in pregnancy is a well‐established risk factor for several adverse obstetric outcomes and subsequent child health. Several studies have described an increased risk of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which is characterized by multiple birth defects, including growth retardation, congenital malformations and neurodevelopmental problems in childhood as well as adulthood after prenatal alcohol exposure . Growth retardation is known to adversely affect several parameters concerning the child's health in general and is associated with a higher mortality as well as morbidity. McIntire et al. found that the neonatal mortality rate for small‐for‐gestational‐age infants was 1% compared with 0.2% for the infants with appropriate birthweights.Many studies show consistent results of the association between average alcohol consumption and the risk of growth restriction , suggesting increasing risk with increasing intake of more than one to two drinks per day . Yet, very few studies have investigated the potential association with alcohol binge drinking. Animal studies indicate that the peak blood concentration of alcohol is the determining factor for the amount of damage to the fetus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica Wiley

Alcohol binge drinking in early pregnancy and the effect on fetal growth: a cohort study

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
ISSN
0001-6349
eISSN
1600-0412
D.O.I.
10.1111/aogs.13329
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsCIconfidence intervalKey messageWe found no statistically significant association between alcohol binge drinking, number of binge drinking episodes or timing of binge drinking and birthweight and birth length.IntroductionAlcohol intake in pregnancy is a well‐established risk factor for several adverse obstetric outcomes and subsequent child health. Several studies have described an increased risk of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which is characterized by multiple birth defects, including growth retardation, congenital malformations and neurodevelopmental problems in childhood as well as adulthood after prenatal alcohol exposure . Growth retardation is known to adversely affect several parameters concerning the child's health in general and is associated with a higher mortality as well as morbidity. McIntire et al. found that the neonatal mortality rate for small‐for‐gestational‐age infants was 1% compared with 0.2% for the infants with appropriate birthweights.Many studies show consistent results of the association between average alcohol consumption and the risk of growth restriction , suggesting increasing risk with increasing intake of more than one to two drinks per day . Yet, very few studies have investigated the potential association with alcohol binge drinking. Animal studies indicate that the peak blood concentration of alcohol is the determining factor for the amount of damage to the fetus

Journal

Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica ScandinavicaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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