Agonistic Behavior in the Squid Loligo plei (Loliginidae, Teuthoidea): Fighting Tactics and the Effects of Size and Resource Value

Agonistic Behavior in the Squid Loligo plei (Loliginidae, Teuthoidea): Fighting Tactics and the... Observations of small schools of squids in captivity suggested that dominance relationships among males were based upon major differences in the frequency or duration of their agonistic behavior, but staged contests showed few differences. During staged contests, squids exhibited up to 21 separate behaviors. Some contests included a complex array of visual signals and side‐by‐side posturing (Lateral Display) followed by physical contact during Fin beating. There was behavioral variability and step‐wise escalation during the contests: squids performed either 1. long sequences of visual signaling followed by Chasing and Fleeing; or 2. short sequences of visual signaling followed by physical Fin beating and ending with Chasing and Fleeing. Size influenced outcome in all contests; larger males were more likely to win the contest. Size had no effect on contest duration, but contest duration was shorter when resource value was high, especially when a male established temporary ownership of a female. We speculate that when the perceived resource value is high, male squids are more likely to engage in a shorter yet riskier fighting tactic. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethology Wiley

Agonistic Behavior in the Squid Loligo plei (Loliginidae, Teuthoidea): Fighting Tactics and the Effects of Size and Resource Value

Ethology, Volume 103 (2) – Feb 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1997 Blackwell Verlag
ISSN
0179-1613
eISSN
1439-0310
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1439-0310.1997.tb00010.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Observations of small schools of squids in captivity suggested that dominance relationships among males were based upon major differences in the frequency or duration of their agonistic behavior, but staged contests showed few differences. During staged contests, squids exhibited up to 21 separate behaviors. Some contests included a complex array of visual signals and side‐by‐side posturing (Lateral Display) followed by physical contact during Fin beating. There was behavioral variability and step‐wise escalation during the contests: squids performed either 1. long sequences of visual signaling followed by Chasing and Fleeing; or 2. short sequences of visual signaling followed by physical Fin beating and ending with Chasing and Fleeing. Size influenced outcome in all contests; larger males were more likely to win the contest. Size had no effect on contest duration, but contest duration was shorter when resource value was high, especially when a male established temporary ownership of a female. We speculate that when the perceived resource value is high, male squids are more likely to engage in a shorter yet riskier fighting tactic.

Journal

EthologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1997

References

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