ADVANCES IN PHOTOCHEMICAL APPROACHES FOR BLOOD STERILIZATION

ADVANCES IN PHOTOCHEMICAL APPROACHES FOR BLOOD STERILIZATION INVITED REVIEW ADVANCES IN PHOTOCHEMICAL APPROACHES FOR BLOOD STERILIZATION EHUD BEN-HUR* and BERNARD HOROWITZ New York Blood Center, Virus Inactivation Laboratory, 310 E. 67th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA (Received 2 May 1995; accepted 2 May 1995) INTRODUCTION Improvements in donor selection and serological testing for some human pathogens’ have resulted in a safer blood supply during the last 10 years. Most importantly, implementation of virucidal procedures for coagulation factor concentrates and plasma have made these blood products completely safe with respect to transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV),? hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Z.3 However, there are still risks of infection associated with transfusion of cellular blood components, i.e. red blood cell (RBC) concentrates and platelet concentrates. This is due to the inability of serological tests to detect viral infection during the “window” p e r i ~ d . ~ In addition, viruses we do not test for may be present and technical errors may occur, albeit infrequently. In the case of protein blood derivatives and plasma, sterilized by the solvent-detergent technique or heat, there is continued transmission of parvovirus B195 and hepatitis A,6 both of which are nonenveloped and heat-stable viruses, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Photochemistry & Photobiology Wiley

ADVANCES IN PHOTOCHEMICAL APPROACHES FOR BLOOD STERILIZATION

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-8655
eISSN
1751-1097
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1751-1097.1995.tb02358.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INVITED REVIEW ADVANCES IN PHOTOCHEMICAL APPROACHES FOR BLOOD STERILIZATION EHUD BEN-HUR* and BERNARD HOROWITZ New York Blood Center, Virus Inactivation Laboratory, 310 E. 67th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA (Received 2 May 1995; accepted 2 May 1995) INTRODUCTION Improvements in donor selection and serological testing for some human pathogens’ have resulted in a safer blood supply during the last 10 years. Most importantly, implementation of virucidal procedures for coagulation factor concentrates and plasma have made these blood products completely safe with respect to transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV),? hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Z.3 However, there are still risks of infection associated with transfusion of cellular blood components, i.e. red blood cell (RBC) concentrates and platelet concentrates. This is due to the inability of serological tests to detect viral infection during the “window” p e r i ~ d . ~ In addition, viruses we do not test for may be present and technical errors may occur, albeit infrequently. In the case of protein blood derivatives and plasma, sterilized by the solvent-detergent technique or heat, there is continued transmission of parvovirus B195 and hepatitis A,6 both of which are nonenveloped and heat-stable viruses,

Journal

Photochemistry & PhotobiologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1995

References

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