Adaptive strategies of perennial grasses in South American savannas

Adaptive strategies of perennial grasses in South American savannas Abstract. Morpho‐fimctional features of perennial grasses in South American savannas are considered as adaptive strategies to cope with stress and disturbance factors of savanna environments. The tussock growth form, annual patterns of vegetative growth and reproductive phenology, allocation of carbon and nutrients, and accumulation of standing dead phytomass at the end of the dry season, are discussed in relation to water economy, resistance to drought, photosynthetic rates, growth rhythms, regrowth after drought and fire, seasonal translocation of critical nutrients and carbohydrates, and the total nutrient budget of the grass layer. Different strategies combining various morphological patterns, phenological alternatives and mechanisms for resisting drought and fire exist within the grass flora of each savanna community. The lack of adaptive responses to grazing by large herbivores is a major distinction from African savanna grasses. Many African grasses, either introduced in pastures or colonizing disturbed savannas, do show positive responses to defoliation, including compensatory growth and enhanced photosynthetic rates. Some guidelines for further research are suggested in order to disclose the mechanisms underlying this different behaviour of native and introduced savanna grasses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Adaptive strategies of perennial grasses in South American savannas

Journal of Vegetation Science, Volume 3 (3) – Jun 1, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/adaptive-strategies-of-perennial-grasses-in-south-american-savannas-mn5fgFljCC
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1992 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3235757
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Morpho‐fimctional features of perennial grasses in South American savannas are considered as adaptive strategies to cope with stress and disturbance factors of savanna environments. The tussock growth form, annual patterns of vegetative growth and reproductive phenology, allocation of carbon and nutrients, and accumulation of standing dead phytomass at the end of the dry season, are discussed in relation to water economy, resistance to drought, photosynthetic rates, growth rhythms, regrowth after drought and fire, seasonal translocation of critical nutrients and carbohydrates, and the total nutrient budget of the grass layer. Different strategies combining various morphological patterns, phenological alternatives and mechanisms for resisting drought and fire exist within the grass flora of each savanna community. The lack of adaptive responses to grazing by large herbivores is a major distinction from African savanna grasses. Many African grasses, either introduced in pastures or colonizing disturbed savannas, do show positive responses to defoliation, including compensatory growth and enhanced photosynthetic rates. Some guidelines for further research are suggested in order to disclose the mechanisms underlying this different behaviour of native and introduced savanna grasses.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1992

References

  • Fire and soil‐plant relations in a pine‐wiregrass savanna on the coastal plain of North Carolina
    Christensen, Christensen
  • Adaptative strategies of woody species in neotropical savannas
    Sarmiento, Sarmiento; Goldstein, Goldstein; Meinzer, Meinzer
  • Growth, morphology and gas exchange of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal Panicum coloratum L., a grass species, under different clipping and fertilization regimes
    Wallace, Wallace

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off