Adaptive evolution in the coccolithophore Gephyrocapsa oceanica following 1,000 generations of selection under elevated CO2

Adaptive evolution in the coccolithophore Gephyrocapsa oceanica following 1,000 generations of... Coccolithophores are important oceanic primary producers not only in terms of photosynthesis but also because they produce calcite plates called coccoliths. Ongoing ocean acidification associated with changing seawater carbonate chemistry may impair calcification and other metabolic functions in coccolithophores. While short‐term ocean acidification effects on calcification and other properties have been examined in a variety of coccolithophore species, long‐term adaptive responses have scarcely been documented, other than for the single species Emiliania huxleyi. Here, we investigated the effects of ocean acidification on another ecologically important coccolithophore species, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, following 1,000 generations of growth under elevated CO2 conditions (1,000 μatm). High CO2‐selected populations exhibited reduced growth rates and enhanced particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) production, relative to populations selected under ambient CO2 (400 μatm). Particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and PIC/POC ratios decreased progressively throughout the selection period in high CO2‐selected cell lines. All of these trait changes persisted when high CO2‐grown populations were moved back to ambient CO2 conditions for about 10 generations. The results suggest that the calcification of some coccolithophores may be more heavily impaired by ocean acidification than previously predicted based on short‐term studies, with potentially large implications for the ocean's carbon cycle under accelerating anthropogenic influences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Change Biology Wiley

Adaptive evolution in the coccolithophore Gephyrocapsa oceanica following 1,000 generations of selection under elevated CO2

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/adaptive-evolution-in-the-coccolithophore-gephyrocapsa-oceanica-Mc06IuZoXa
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1354-1013
eISSN
1365-2486
D.O.I.
10.1111/gcb.14065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coccolithophores are important oceanic primary producers not only in terms of photosynthesis but also because they produce calcite plates called coccoliths. Ongoing ocean acidification associated with changing seawater carbonate chemistry may impair calcification and other metabolic functions in coccolithophores. While short‐term ocean acidification effects on calcification and other properties have been examined in a variety of coccolithophore species, long‐term adaptive responses have scarcely been documented, other than for the single species Emiliania huxleyi. Here, we investigated the effects of ocean acidification on another ecologically important coccolithophore species, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, following 1,000 generations of growth under elevated CO2 conditions (1,000 μatm). High CO2‐selected populations exhibited reduced growth rates and enhanced particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) production, relative to populations selected under ambient CO2 (400 μatm). Particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and PIC/POC ratios decreased progressively throughout the selection period in high CO2‐selected cell lines. All of these trait changes persisted when high CO2‐grown populations were moved back to ambient CO2 conditions for about 10 generations. The results suggest that the calcification of some coccolithophores may be more heavily impaired by ocean acidification than previously predicted based on short‐term studies, with potentially large implications for the ocean's carbon cycle under accelerating anthropogenic influences.

Journal

Global Change BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off