Abstracts & Authors’ Biographies

Abstracts & Authors’ Biographies Frustrated Seeing: Scale, Visibility, and a Fifteenth‐Century Portuguese Royal MonumentJessica BarkerThis article teases apart an apparent paradox: despite their innovative designs and artistic virtuosity, some of the most celebrated funerary effigies of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries are extremely difficult to see in situ. Opening with a consideration of the political, social and religious significance of partial visibility in the later Middle Ages, the issues of sight and scale are further interrogated through the study of an important (and largely unknown) fifteenth‐century royal tomb in Portugal. Through an examination of the extraordinary height of this monument and its implications for the relationship between the sculpted effigies and their viewers, this essay complicates the notion that late‐medieval art was characterized by a ‘need to see’, arguing that the limited, conditional or partial visibility of an artwork could be a strategy to produce a distinctive type of aesthetic experience, lending the memorial both meaning and importance.Jessica Barker is a Lecturer in Art History at the University of East Anglia. She recently published an edited collection of essays, Revisiting the Monument (Courtauld Books On‐Line, 2016), examining the legacy of Panofsky’s writing on funerary monuments, and has articles in British Art Studies, Gesta http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Art History Wiley

Abstracts & Authors’ Biographies

Art History , Volume 41 (2) – Jan 1, 2018
Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/abstracts-authors-biographies-x9veqDEp90
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© Association for Art History 2018
ISSN
0141-6790
eISSN
1467-8365
D.O.I.
10.1111/1467-8365.12390
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Frustrated Seeing: Scale, Visibility, and a Fifteenth‐Century Portuguese Royal MonumentJessica BarkerThis article teases apart an apparent paradox: despite their innovative designs and artistic virtuosity, some of the most celebrated funerary effigies of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries are extremely difficult to see in situ. Opening with a consideration of the political, social and religious significance of partial visibility in the later Middle Ages, the issues of sight and scale are further interrogated through the study of an important (and largely unknown) fifteenth‐century royal tomb in Portugal. Through an examination of the extraordinary height of this monument and its implications for the relationship between the sculpted effigies and their viewers, this essay complicates the notion that late‐medieval art was characterized by a ‘need to see’, arguing that the limited, conditional or partial visibility of an artwork could be a strategy to produce a distinctive type of aesthetic experience, lending the memorial both meaning and importance.Jessica Barker is a Lecturer in Art History at the University of East Anglia. She recently published an edited collection of essays, Revisiting the Monument (Courtauld Books On‐Line, 2016), examining the legacy of Panofsky’s writing on funerary monuments, and has articles in British Art Studies, Gesta

Journal

Art HistoryWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off