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ABSTRACTION AND IMAGINATION IN LATE ANTIQUITY

ABSTRACTION AND IMAGINATION IN LATE ANTIQUITY Art History © R.K.P. 1980 Vol. 3 N o . 1 March 1980 Í1.50/1 0141—6790/80/0301—0001 ABSTRACTION AND IMAGINATION IN LATE ANTIQUITY general nature of the change in art between the first and seventh centuries. Equally it is an oversimplification to define the five hundred years or so before and after our period as ones of relative constancy with the intervening half millennium as a time of constant change; yet it is apparent that while the changes within the earlier Classical and later Medieval periods are irregular in character, with different movements pushing in different directions and occasional returns to very similar positions, the linking period is marked to a much greater degree by a consistency of direction in the stylistic changes, with, for example, the Severan, Constantinian, Theodosian and Justinianic periods each being marked by a progressive decrease in the 'Classical' and increase in the 'Medieval' stylistic traits. Indeed the continuity in the direction of change over a period of at least five hundred years is one of the most striking aspects of Late Antique art and one that raises fundamental questions as to the nature of art historical explanation. For a long time Late Antique art was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Art History Wiley

ABSTRACTION AND IMAGINATION IN LATE ANTIQUITY

Art History , Volume 3 (1) – Mar 1, 1980

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© ASSOCIATION OF ART HISTORIANS
ISSN
0141-6790
eISSN
1467-8365
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-8365.1980.tb00061.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Art History © R.K.P. 1980 Vol. 3 N o . 1 March 1980 Í1.50/1 0141—6790/80/0301—0001 ABSTRACTION AND IMAGINATION IN LATE ANTIQUITY general nature of the change in art between the first and seventh centuries. Equally it is an oversimplification to define the five hundred years or so before and after our period as ones of relative constancy with the intervening half millennium as a time of constant change; yet it is apparent that while the changes within the earlier Classical and later Medieval periods are irregular in character, with different movements pushing in different directions and occasional returns to very similar positions, the linking period is marked to a much greater degree by a consistency of direction in the stylistic changes, with, for example, the Severan, Constantinian, Theodosian and Justinianic periods each being marked by a progressive decrease in the 'Classical' and increase in the 'Medieval' stylistic traits. Indeed the continuity in the direction of change over a period of at least five hundred years is one of the most striking aspects of Late Antique art and one that raises fundamental questions as to the nature of art historical explanation. For a long time Late Antique art was

Journal

Art HistoryWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1980

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