A THEORY OF PLANT GEOGRAPHY

A THEORY OF PLANT GEOGRAPHY A THEORY OF PLANT GEOGRAPHY BY R. D'O. GOOD, M.A. CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . TAGE i o Principles of Angiosperm Geiigraph)' . Introduction to the Theory of Tolerance Enunciation of the Theory' of Tolerance The meaning and application of the Theory' The evidence for the Theory of Tolerance Conclusion . . . . . . . INTRODUCTIOX . . . . . . . . . of Tolerance , . . . . . . . . . . 151 153 155 155 167 1 7° N the course of some years' work on the geographical distribution of the Angiosperms, I have piid particular attention to certain theoretical aspects of the subject. More especially have I endeavoured to discover the principles underlying the processes of distribution in order to use them as a basis for a working hypothesis capable of explaining the chief features of Angiosperm geography. Up to the present I have come to certain conclusions which, although doubtless incomplete, nevertheless appear to me sufficiently interesting and useful to warrant their pubhcation. Briefly these results are as follows: first, the recognition that six general statements (set out below) are so http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Phytologist Wiley

A THEORY OF PLANT GEOGRAPHY

New Phytologist, Volume 30 (3) – Jul 1, 1931

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1931 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0028-646X
eISSN
1469-8137
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1469-8137.1931.tb07414.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A THEORY OF PLANT GEOGRAPHY BY R. D'O. GOOD, M.A. CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . TAGE i o Principles of Angiosperm Geiigraph)' . Introduction to the Theory of Tolerance Enunciation of the Theory' of Tolerance The meaning and application of the Theory' The evidence for the Theory of Tolerance Conclusion . . . . . . . INTRODUCTIOX . . . . . . . . . of Tolerance , . . . . . . . . . . 151 153 155 155 167 1 7° N the course of some years' work on the geographical distribution of the Angiosperms, I have piid particular attention to certain theoretical aspects of the subject. More especially have I endeavoured to discover the principles underlying the processes of distribution in order to use them as a basis for a working hypothesis capable of explaining the chief features of Angiosperm geography. Up to the present I have come to certain conclusions which, although doubtless incomplete, nevertheless appear to me sufficiently interesting and useful to warrant their pubhcation. Briefly these results are as follows: first, the recognition that six general statements (set out below) are so

Journal

New PhytologistWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1931

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