A survey of forest composition in the Gombe National Park, Tanzania

A survey of forest composition in the Gombe National Park, Tanzania T . H . C L U T T O N - B R O C K and J . B. G I L L E T T " King's College Research Centre, Cambridge, England, and *East African Herbarium, Nairobi, Kenya. Introduction Gombe National Park has been the site of ecological studies of chimpanzees (LawickGoodall, 1968; Wrangham, 1975, 1977), baboons (Ransom 8c Ransom, 1972) and red colobus (Clutton-Brock, 1975a,b). However, information concerning the vegetation of the park is sparse: apart from Thomas's brief description (1961) which appears to have been based on drier areas of the park, the only information available is to be found in primarily zoological papers. The forest is of particular interest because it contains a number of species seldom recorded in Tanzania as well as coastal species not previously known so far inland (see Appendix). The Park is sited on the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika, some 15 km north of Kigoma (4'40' S , 29'38' E). It consists of a 10-mile strip of mountainous country, bordered by the lake on the western side, and by the crest of the rift escarpment, which lies 3-4 km inland from the lake, on the eastern boundary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of Ecology Wiley

A survey of forest composition in the Gombe National Park, Tanzania

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0141-6707
eISSN
1365-2028
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2028.1979.tb00250.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

T . H . C L U T T O N - B R O C K and J . B. G I L L E T T " King's College Research Centre, Cambridge, England, and *East African Herbarium, Nairobi, Kenya. Introduction Gombe National Park has been the site of ecological studies of chimpanzees (LawickGoodall, 1968; Wrangham, 1975, 1977), baboons (Ransom 8c Ransom, 1972) and red colobus (Clutton-Brock, 1975a,b). However, information concerning the vegetation of the park is sparse: apart from Thomas's brief description (1961) which appears to have been based on drier areas of the park, the only information available is to be found in primarily zoological papers. The forest is of particular interest because it contains a number of species seldom recorded in Tanzania as well as coastal species not previously known so far inland (see Appendix). The Park is sited on the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika, some 15 km north of Kigoma (4'40' S , 29'38' E). It consists of a 10-mile strip of mountainous country, bordered by the lake on the western side, and by the crest of the rift escarpment, which lies 3-4 km inland from the lake, on the eastern boundary

Journal

African Journal of EcologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1979

References

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