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A Stereotype Threat Account of Boys' Academic Underachievement

A Stereotype Threat Account of Boys' Academic Underachievement Three studies examined the role of stereotype threat in boys' academic underachievement. Study 1 (children aged 4–10, n = 238) showed that girls from age 4 years and boys from age 7 years believed, and thought adults believed, that boys are academically inferior to girls. Study 2 manipulated stereotype threat, informing children aged 7–8 years (n = 162) that boys tend to do worse than girls at school. This manipulation hindered boys' performance on a reading, writing, and math test, but did not affect girls' performance. Study 3 counteracted stereotype threat, informing children aged 6–9 years (n = 184) that boys and girls were expected to perform similarly. This improved the performance of boys and did not affect that of girls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Child Development Wiley

A Stereotype Threat Account of Boys' Academic Underachievement

Child Development , Volume 84 (5) – Sep 1, 2013

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Child Development © 2013 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
ISSN
0009-3920
eISSN
1467-8624
DOI
10.1111/cdev.12079
pmid
23402479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Three studies examined the role of stereotype threat in boys' academic underachievement. Study 1 (children aged 4–10, n = 238) showed that girls from age 4 years and boys from age 7 years believed, and thought adults believed, that boys are academically inferior to girls. Study 2 manipulated stereotype threat, informing children aged 7–8 years (n = 162) that boys tend to do worse than girls at school. This manipulation hindered boys' performance on a reading, writing, and math test, but did not affect girls' performance. Study 3 counteracted stereotype threat, informing children aged 6–9 years (n = 184) that boys and girls were expected to perform similarly. This improved the performance of boys and did not affect that of girls.

Journal

Child DevelopmentWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2013

References