A Soluble brain molecule related to epidermal growth factor receptor is a mitogen inhibitor for astrocytes

A Soluble brain molecule related to epidermal growth factor receptor is a mitogen inhibitor for... The astrocyte mitogenic activity of normal and injured rat brain extracts was greatly enhanced by antibodies to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The antibodies appear to act by removing from the extracts inhibitory molecules immunologically related to EGFR. Three molecular species recognized by anti‐EGFR antibody in brain extracts (molecular weights 41, 52, and 69 kilodaltons) did not seem to originate from EGFR proteolysis. The increase in astrocyte mitogenic activity in brain tissue following injury correlated with a reduction in the levels of soluble EFGR‐cross‐reacting material and a decrease in mitogen inhibitory activity. The decrease in EGFR‐related mitogen inhibitor also correlated with a large increase in astrocyte membrane EGFR immunoreactivity, and intracerebral injection of antibodies to EGFR caused the appearance at the injection site of numerous EGFR‐positive reactive astrocytes. Invasion of brain tissue by EGF/EGFR‐related blood components may be the signal that initiates astrocyte activation. EGFR‐related immunoreactive molecules are also present in extracts of other tissues and may have a general role in the control of cell division. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuroscience Research Wiley

A Soluble brain molecule related to epidermal growth factor receptor is a mitogen inhibitor for astrocytes

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Alan R. Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0360-4012
eISSN
1097-4547
D.O.I.
10.1002/jnr.490220105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The astrocyte mitogenic activity of normal and injured rat brain extracts was greatly enhanced by antibodies to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The antibodies appear to act by removing from the extracts inhibitory molecules immunologically related to EGFR. Three molecular species recognized by anti‐EGFR antibody in brain extracts (molecular weights 41, 52, and 69 kilodaltons) did not seem to originate from EGFR proteolysis. The increase in astrocyte mitogenic activity in brain tissue following injury correlated with a reduction in the levels of soluble EFGR‐cross‐reacting material and a decrease in mitogen inhibitory activity. The decrease in EGFR‐related mitogen inhibitor also correlated with a large increase in astrocyte membrane EGFR immunoreactivity, and intracerebral injection of antibodies to EGFR caused the appearance at the injection site of numerous EGFR‐positive reactive astrocytes. Invasion of brain tissue by EGF/EGFR‐related blood components may be the signal that initiates astrocyte activation. EGFR‐related immunoreactive molecules are also present in extracts of other tissues and may have a general role in the control of cell division.

Journal

Journal of Neuroscience ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1989

References

  • Receptors for epidermal growth factor and other polypeptide mitogens
    Carpenter, Carpenter
  • Role of the plasmin‐generating system in the developing nervous tissue: Proteolysis as a mitogenic signal for the glial cells
    Kalderon, Kalderon
  • Preparation of separate astroglial and oligodendroglial cell cultures from rat cerebral tissue
    McCarthy, McCarthy; de Vellis, de Vellis
  • Interleukin‐1‐like activity in rat brain: Sources, targets and effect of injury
    Nieto‐Sampedro, Nieto‐Sampedro; Berman, Berman

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