A roadmap for paediatric and neonatal critical care nursing science in Europe: engage, action and impact

A roadmap for paediatric and neonatal critical care nursing science in Europe: engage, action and... Paediatric and neonatal intensive care nursing are both distinct and at times quite different from adult intensive care nursing. An example of the discrepancy between critically ill children and adults in intensive care units is the unique relationship with the parents of critically ill infants and children (Latour and Haines ). Unlike carers, partners and spouses of adult intensive care patients, parents are the primary caregiver and are fundamental to the child's existence and recovery. In addition, for the last 30 years most Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) and Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) in north‐western European countries and in the USA have allowed and indeed encouraged 24‐h parental visitation and participation in the care of their critically ill child. This standard practice is still under debate in adult intensive care (Giannini et al. , ). Other documented differences relate to registered nurse staffing levels and the academic level of education that nurses receive to work in these specialities (Baktoft et al. , ; Gill et al. , , Aitken et al. , ). But even within paediatrics, differences exist between and among PICUs and NICUs in care delivery and organization (Nipshagen et al. , ). The NICUs http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing in Critical Care Wiley

A roadmap for paediatric and neonatal critical care nursing science in Europe: engage, action and impact

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses
ISSN
1362-1017
eISSN
1478-5153
DOI
10.1111/nicc.12175
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Paediatric and neonatal intensive care nursing are both distinct and at times quite different from adult intensive care nursing. An example of the discrepancy between critically ill children and adults in intensive care units is the unique relationship with the parents of critically ill infants and children (Latour and Haines ). Unlike carers, partners and spouses of adult intensive care patients, parents are the primary caregiver and are fundamental to the child's existence and recovery. In addition, for the last 30 years most Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) and Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) in north‐western European countries and in the USA have allowed and indeed encouraged 24‐h parental visitation and participation in the care of their critically ill child. This standard practice is still under debate in adult intensive care (Giannini et al. , ). Other documented differences relate to registered nurse staffing levels and the academic level of education that nurses receive to work in these specialities (Baktoft et al. , ; Gill et al. , , Aitken et al. , ). But even within paediatrics, differences exist between and among PICUs and NICUs in care delivery and organization (Nipshagen et al. , ). The NICUs

Journal

Nursing in Critical CareWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2015

References

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