A retrospective study of feline trauma patients admitted to a referral centre

A retrospective study of feline trauma patients admitted to a referral centre INTRODUCTIONTrauma can be defined as physical injury to the body, leading to tissue damage as a direct result of a violent or accidental event (Muir ). In total, 12 to 13% of cases presented to veterinarians have incurred traumatic injury, making it one of the most prevalent disorders both in referral and primary practices, with the most common causes being road traffic accidents (RTA), animal altercations and unknown causes (Kolata et al. , O'Neill et al. ). Studies have found recurrent characteristics in feline trauma cases, with young cats, male cats and those that are allowed outdoor access being more likely to be involved in traumatic events (Buffington , Rochlitz ).A number of studies have looked at different severity scoring systems as prognostic indicators for trauma cases. The Animal Trauma Triage (ATT) score, Modified Glasgow Coma Score and the Feline Acute Patient Physiological and Laboratory Evaluation score are previously validated severity scoring systems (Rockar et al. , Platt et al. , Hayes et al. ). However, none of these has been validated in a population consisting only of cat trauma patients, although a study examining cats involved in RTAs using a simplified severity score (SS) based on traumatic injuries, showed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Small Animal Practice Wiley

A retrospective study of feline trauma patients admitted to a referral centre

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 British Small Animal Veterinary Association
ISSN
0022-4510
eISSN
1748-5827
D.O.I.
10.1111/jsap.12815
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONTrauma can be defined as physical injury to the body, leading to tissue damage as a direct result of a violent or accidental event (Muir ). In total, 12 to 13% of cases presented to veterinarians have incurred traumatic injury, making it one of the most prevalent disorders both in referral and primary practices, with the most common causes being road traffic accidents (RTA), animal altercations and unknown causes (Kolata et al. , O'Neill et al. ). Studies have found recurrent characteristics in feline trauma cases, with young cats, male cats and those that are allowed outdoor access being more likely to be involved in traumatic events (Buffington , Rochlitz ).A number of studies have looked at different severity scoring systems as prognostic indicators for trauma cases. The Animal Trauma Triage (ATT) score, Modified Glasgow Coma Score and the Feline Acute Patient Physiological and Laboratory Evaluation score are previously validated severity scoring systems (Rockar et al. , Platt et al. , Hayes et al. ). However, none of these has been validated in a population consisting only of cat trauma patients, although a study examining cats involved in RTAs using a simplified severity score (SS) based on traumatic injuries, showed

Journal

Journal of Small Animal PracticeWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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