A replicated 3000 yr proxy‐climate record from Coom Rigg Moss and Felecia Moss, the Border Mires, northern England

A replicated 3000 yr proxy‐climate record from Coom Rigg Moss and Felecia Moss, the Border... Quantitative plant macrofossil and colorimetric humification analyses have been used to reconstruct proxy‐climate from two paired ombrotrophic bogs in northern England (Coom Rigg Moss and Felecia Moss). Detrended correspondence analysis was used to transform the raw floral data into indices of mire surface wetness. The chronology of each peat profile was determined by radiocarbon assay, supported by pollen correlations. Palaeoclimatic reconstructions have been made by linking documented historical changes in climate, and other proxy‐climate records, to those inferred from the sites investigated in the study region. Both sites contain a sensitive palaeoclimatic record, as ten periods of increased effective precipitation have been detected between ca. cal. ad 1770–1800, ad 1400–1470, ad 1110–1260, ad 920–1060, ad 550–670, ad 210–360, 30 bc to ad 80, 180–130 bc, 590–520 bc and 760–710 bc. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Quaternary Science Wiley

A replicated 3000 yr proxy‐climate record from Coom Rigg Moss and Felecia Moss, the Border Mires, northern England

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0267-8179
eISSN
1099-1417
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1099-1417(199905)14:3<263::AID-JQS445>3.0.CO;2-W
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Quantitative plant macrofossil and colorimetric humification analyses have been used to reconstruct proxy‐climate from two paired ombrotrophic bogs in northern England (Coom Rigg Moss and Felecia Moss). Detrended correspondence analysis was used to transform the raw floral data into indices of mire surface wetness. The chronology of each peat profile was determined by radiocarbon assay, supported by pollen correlations. Palaeoclimatic reconstructions have been made by linking documented historical changes in climate, and other proxy‐climate records, to those inferred from the sites investigated in the study region. Both sites contain a sensitive palaeoclimatic record, as ten periods of increased effective precipitation have been detected between ca. cal. ad 1770–1800, ad 1400–1470, ad 1110–1260, ad 920–1060, ad 550–670, ad 210–360, 30 bc to ad 80, 180–130 bc, 590–520 bc and 760–710 bc. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Journal of Quaternary ScienceWiley

Published: May 1, 1999

References

  • Current problems of environmental gradients and species response curves in relation to continuum theory
    Austin, Austin; Gaywood, Gaywood
  • Replicability and variability of the recent macrofossil and proxy‐climate record from raised bogs: field stratigraphy and macrofossil data from Bolton Fell Moss and Walton Moss, Cumbria, England
    Barber, Barber; Dumayne‐peaty, Dumayne‐peaty; Hughes, Hughes; Mauquoy, Mauquoy; Scaife, Scaife
  • Proxy climate record for the last 1000 years from Irish blanket peat and a possible link to solar variability
    Blackford, Blackford; Chambers, Chambers
  • Bog development and environmental conditions as shown by the stratigraphy of Store Moss in southern Sweden
    Svensson, Svensson
  • Archaeological and palaeoecological indications of an abrupt climate change in The Netherlands, and evidence for climatological teleconnections around 2650 BP
    van Geel, van Geel; Buurman, Buurman; Waterbolk, Waterbolk

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