A quality audit of the service delivered by the NSW Neonatal and Paediatric Transport Service

A quality audit of the service delivered by the NSW Neonatal and Paediatric Transport Service Aim: To discover areas of NSW Neonatal and Paediatric Transport Service's (NETS) work with which the parents, referring and receiving doctors are dissatisfied and respond to them. Methods: An anonymous survey of referring doctors, parents of patients transported by NETS and receiving hospital doctors between July and December 2005. Results: Referring doctors: Fifty‐seven per cent of the 288 (30% response rate) doctors who responded were paediatricians and 43% worked in rural settings. Over 90% responded positively about communication with the NETS team at referral and retrieval. Useful feedback included the need to be more time efficient in phone communication and during stabilisation of the child and to improve feedback about management and patient outcomes. Parents: Forty‐seven per cent of 152 responses (15% response rate) came from rural families. The majority (>98%) of parents felt that the NETS team were helpful and supportive of them. Parents reported being able to travel with their child 60% of the time and of those who could not, 95% could explain why. Receiving doctors: Ninety‐three per cent of 218 responses (42% response rate) thought that the referral was appropriate, that the NETS teams carried out their advice correctly (98%) and that the child's needs were reported accurately by the team (90%). In a minority of retrievals important concerns were raised about ventilation, sedation, patient assessment and management. Conclusion: Most retrievals happen in a way that referring consultants, parents and receiving consultants find appropriate. Important suggestions for improvement in service delivery and some areas of risk to patient safety have been identified. Processes for overcoming these situations are being developed and implemented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health Wiley

A quality audit of the service delivered by the NSW Neonatal and Paediatric Transport Service

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-quality-audit-of-the-service-delivered-by-the-nsw-neonatal-and-8Sj1IfQNE3
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2007 The Authors
ISSN
1034-4810
eISSN
1440-1754
DOI
10.1111/j.1440-1754.2007.01253.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim: To discover areas of NSW Neonatal and Paediatric Transport Service's (NETS) work with which the parents, referring and receiving doctors are dissatisfied and respond to them. Methods: An anonymous survey of referring doctors, parents of patients transported by NETS and receiving hospital doctors between July and December 2005. Results: Referring doctors: Fifty‐seven per cent of the 288 (30% response rate) doctors who responded were paediatricians and 43% worked in rural settings. Over 90% responded positively about communication with the NETS team at referral and retrieval. Useful feedback included the need to be more time efficient in phone communication and during stabilisation of the child and to improve feedback about management and patient outcomes. Parents: Forty‐seven per cent of 152 responses (15% response rate) came from rural families. The majority (>98%) of parents felt that the NETS team were helpful and supportive of them. Parents reported being able to travel with their child 60% of the time and of those who could not, 95% could explain why. Receiving doctors: Ninety‐three per cent of 218 responses (42% response rate) thought that the referral was appropriate, that the NETS teams carried out their advice correctly (98%) and that the child's needs were reported accurately by the team (90%). In a minority of retrievals important concerns were raised about ventilation, sedation, patient assessment and management. Conclusion: Most retrievals happen in a way that referring consultants, parents and receiving consultants find appropriate. Important suggestions for improvement in service delivery and some areas of risk to patient safety have been identified. Processes for overcoming these situations are being developed and implemented.

Journal

Journal of Paediatrics and Child HealthWiley

Published: May 1, 2008

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off