A prospective microbiologic surveillance program to detect and prevent the transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets

A prospective microbiologic surveillance program to detect and prevent the transfusion of... After two patients received bacterially contaminated platelet transfusions, a prospective surveillance program was instituted to perform Gram staining and microbiologic culturing of platelets at the time of transfusion. In 12 months, 3141 random‐donor platelet pools (prepared from 14,481 units) and 2476 single‐donor apheresis units were cultured. All single‐donor apheresis units were sterile, but 6 (0.19%) of the random‐donor pools were found to be bacterially contaminated, with 1 unit of 5 in the pool being the source in each case. Contaminants were Staphylococcus epidermidis (4 cases), Bacillus cereus (1), and Staphylococcus aureus (1) at counts of 0.5 × 10(2) to 10(11) colony‐forming units per mL in platelet pools and 10(3) to 10(13) colony‐forming units per mL in source units. The contamination rate for units transfused at < or = 4 days (1.8/10,000) was significantly lower than that at 5 days (11.9/10,000; p < 0.05), as was the magnitude of contamination (p < 0.05). Use of the pretransfusion Gram stain on 4‐ and 5‐day‐old platelet pools was 100 percent sensitive (4/4 true positives) and 99.93 percent specific (1 false positive) in detecting contaminated pools. These data define the extent and magnitude of platelet bacterial contamination and demonstrate the efficacy of the pretransfusion Gram stain on platelet units stored for 4 and 5 days in preventing the transfusion of heavily contaminated units. It is concluded that the risk of platelet contamination is related to the duration of component storage. Transfusion services can minimize this risk by selecting shorter platelet outdates or by screening 4‐ and 5‐day‐old platelets with a pretransfusion Gram stain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

A prospective microbiologic surveillance program to detect and prevent the transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-prospective-microbiologic-surveillance-program-to-detect-and-prevent-zm7i0TXHIY
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1993 AABB
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1537-2995.1993.331194082380.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

After two patients received bacterially contaminated platelet transfusions, a prospective surveillance program was instituted to perform Gram staining and microbiologic culturing of platelets at the time of transfusion. In 12 months, 3141 random‐donor platelet pools (prepared from 14,481 units) and 2476 single‐donor apheresis units were cultured. All single‐donor apheresis units were sterile, but 6 (0.19%) of the random‐donor pools were found to be bacterially contaminated, with 1 unit of 5 in the pool being the source in each case. Contaminants were Staphylococcus epidermidis (4 cases), Bacillus cereus (1), and Staphylococcus aureus (1) at counts of 0.5 × 10(2) to 10(11) colony‐forming units per mL in platelet pools and 10(3) to 10(13) colony‐forming units per mL in source units. The contamination rate for units transfused at < or = 4 days (1.8/10,000) was significantly lower than that at 5 days (11.9/10,000; p < 0.05), as was the magnitude of contamination (p < 0.05). Use of the pretransfusion Gram stain on 4‐ and 5‐day‐old platelet pools was 100 percent sensitive (4/4 true positives) and 99.93 percent specific (1 false positive) in detecting contaminated pools. These data define the extent and magnitude of platelet bacterial contamination and demonstrate the efficacy of the pretransfusion Gram stain on platelet units stored for 4 and 5 days in preventing the transfusion of heavily contaminated units. It is concluded that the risk of platelet contamination is related to the duration of component storage. Transfusion services can minimize this risk by selecting shorter platelet outdates or by screening 4‐ and 5‐day‐old platelets with a pretransfusion Gram stain.

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: Nov 12, 1993

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off