A potential role for excitotoxins in the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury

A potential role for excitotoxins in the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury It has been proposed that endogenously released excitatory amino acids may contribute to injury of the central nervous system in a variety of disorders including certain neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, and cerebral ischemia. In the present studies we evaluated the hypothesis that excitatory amino acids, acting at the N‐methyl‐D‐aspartate (NMDA) receptor, contribute to secondary tissue damage following traumatic spinal cord injury. Administration of NMDA, adjacent to the trauma site, significantly worsened the outcome after thoracic cord injury in rats, whereas its stereoisomer, N‐methyl‐L‐aspartate (NMLA), was without effect. Systemic treatment with MK‐801—a selective, centrally active, NMDA antagonist—significantly improved neurological outcome after trauma. These findings extend the excitotoxin concept to central nervous system trauma and indicate that NMDA antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

A potential role for excitotoxins in the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury

Annals of Neurology, Volume 23 (6) – Jun 1, 1988

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-potential-role-for-excitotoxins-in-the-pathophysiology-of-spinal-sWGiGiyAeZ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
D.O.I.
10.1002/ana.410230618
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It has been proposed that endogenously released excitatory amino acids may contribute to injury of the central nervous system in a variety of disorders including certain neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, and cerebral ischemia. In the present studies we evaluated the hypothesis that excitatory amino acids, acting at the N‐methyl‐D‐aspartate (NMDA) receptor, contribute to secondary tissue damage following traumatic spinal cord injury. Administration of NMDA, adjacent to the trauma site, significantly worsened the outcome after thoracic cord injury in rats, whereas its stereoisomer, N‐methyl‐L‐aspartate (NMLA), was without effect. Systemic treatment with MK‐801—a selective, centrally active, NMDA antagonist—significantly improved neurological outcome after trauma. These findings extend the excitotoxin concept to central nervous system trauma and indicate that NMDA antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1988

References

  • Cytotoxic effects of acidic and sulphur containing amino acids on the infant mouse central nervous system
    Olney, Olney; Ho, Ho; Rhee, Rhee
  • Role of excitatory amino acid receptors in mono‐ and polysynaptic excitation in the cat spinal cord
    Davies, Davies; Watkins, Watkins
  • Effects of excitatory neurotransmitter amino acids on swelling of rat brain cortical slices
    Chan, Chan; Fishman, Fishman; Lee, Lee

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off