A physically based model for the topographic control on shallow landsliding

A physically based model for the topographic control on shallow landsliding A model for the topographic influence on shallow landslide initiation is developed by coupling digital terrain data with near‐surface through flow and slope stability models. The hydrologic model TOPOG (O'Loughlin, 1986) predicts the degree of soil saturation in response to a steady state rainfall for topographic elements defined by the intersection of contours and flow tube boundaries. The slope stability component uses this relative soil saturation to analyze the stability of each topographic element for the case of cohesionless soils of spatially constant thickness and saturated conductivity. The steady state rainfall predicted to cause instability in each topographic element provides a measure of the relative potential for shallow landsliding. The spatial distribution of critical rainfall values is compared with landslide locations mapped from aerial photographs and in the field for three study basins where high‐resolution digital elevation data are available: Tennessee Valley in Marin County, California; Mettman Ridge in the Oregon Coast Range; and Split Creek on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Model predictions in each of these areas are consistent with spatial patterns of observed landslide scars, although hydrologic complexities not accounted for in the model (e.g., spatial variability of soil properties and bedrock flow) control specific sites and timing of debris flow initiation within areas of similar topographic control. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

A physically based model for the topographic control on shallow landsliding

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-physically-based-model-for-the-topographic-control-on-shallow-JWA0TtDC2Y
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/93WR02979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A model for the topographic influence on shallow landslide initiation is developed by coupling digital terrain data with near‐surface through flow and slope stability models. The hydrologic model TOPOG (O'Loughlin, 1986) predicts the degree of soil saturation in response to a steady state rainfall for topographic elements defined by the intersection of contours and flow tube boundaries. The slope stability component uses this relative soil saturation to analyze the stability of each topographic element for the case of cohesionless soils of spatially constant thickness and saturated conductivity. The steady state rainfall predicted to cause instability in each topographic element provides a measure of the relative potential for shallow landsliding. The spatial distribution of critical rainfall values is compared with landslide locations mapped from aerial photographs and in the field for three study basins where high‐resolution digital elevation data are available: Tennessee Valley in Marin County, California; Mettman Ridge in the Oregon Coast Range; and Split Creek on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Model predictions in each of these areas are consistent with spatial patterns of observed landslide scars, although hydrologic complexities not accounted for in the model (e.g., spatial variability of soil properties and bedrock flow) control specific sites and timing of debris flow initiation within areas of similar topographic control.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1994

References

  • Sediment transport by burrowing mammals, Marin County, California
    Black, Black; Montgomery, Montgomery
  • GIS techniques and statistical models in evaluating landslide hazard
    Carrara, Carrara; Cardinali, Cardinali; Detti, Detti; Guzzetti, Guzzetti; Pasqui, Pasqui; Reichenback, Reichenback
  • Relative instability of colluvium‐filled bedrock depressions
    Crozier, Crozier; Vaughn, Vaughn; Tippett, Tippett
  • Groundwater seepage vectors and the potential for hillslope failure and debris flow mobilization
    Iverson, Iverson; Major, Major
  • Source areas, drainage density, and channel initiation
    Montgomery, Montgomery; Dietrich, Dietrich
  • A theoretical model of the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability
    Sidle, Sidle

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off