A novel association between high red blood cell alloimmunization rates and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

A novel association between high red blood cell alloimmunization rates and hereditary hemorrhagic... ABBREVIATIONSACVRL1/ALK1activin receptor‐like kinaseAPC(s)antigen‐presenting cell(s)AVM(s)arteriovenous malformation(s)DC(s)dendritic cell(s)ENGendoglinHHThereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasiaAlloimmunization to non‐ABO red blood cell (RBC) antigens is one of the most common complications of repeated RBC transfusions. Alloimmunization rates are approximately 1% to 3% in general hospital–based patients and can reach up to 50% in transfusion‐dependent patients such as patients with sickle cell disease. Non‐ABO RBC alloantibodies increase the risk of immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, which are one of the leading causes of transfusion‐related mortality reported to the Food and Drug Administration. Patients with alloantibodies are also more likely to experience delays in transfusions because the numbers of compatible RBCs for transfusions are limited; such delays can also lead to complications resulting in morbidity and mortality. In addition, maternal alloantibodies in the setting of pregnancy may lead to severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Because of its frequency and associated clinical complications, numerous studies of alloimmunization have been undertaken to discover underlying causes that drive alloantibody development. To date, alloimmunization has been associated with multiple risk factors including transfusion load, age, sex, inflammatory status, immunogenicity of RBC antigens, RBC unit processing, and modifications—all of these potentially affect alloimmunization. However, the association between alloimmunization and specific disease http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

A novel association between high red blood cell alloimmunization rates and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-novel-association-between-high-red-blood-cell-alloimmunization-rates-kSh2TaeGxr
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 AABB
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
D.O.I.
10.1111/trf.14451
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABBREVIATIONSACVRL1/ALK1activin receptor‐like kinaseAPC(s)antigen‐presenting cell(s)AVM(s)arteriovenous malformation(s)DC(s)dendritic cell(s)ENGendoglinHHThereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasiaAlloimmunization to non‐ABO red blood cell (RBC) antigens is one of the most common complications of repeated RBC transfusions. Alloimmunization rates are approximately 1% to 3% in general hospital–based patients and can reach up to 50% in transfusion‐dependent patients such as patients with sickle cell disease. Non‐ABO RBC alloantibodies increase the risk of immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, which are one of the leading causes of transfusion‐related mortality reported to the Food and Drug Administration. Patients with alloantibodies are also more likely to experience delays in transfusions because the numbers of compatible RBCs for transfusions are limited; such delays can also lead to complications resulting in morbidity and mortality. In addition, maternal alloantibodies in the setting of pregnancy may lead to severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Because of its frequency and associated clinical complications, numerous studies of alloimmunization have been undertaken to discover underlying causes that drive alloantibody development. To date, alloimmunization has been associated with multiple risk factors including transfusion load, age, sex, inflammatory status, immunogenicity of RBC antigens, RBC unit processing, and modifications—all of these potentially affect alloimmunization. However, the association between alloimmunization and specific disease

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial