A new scale for the measurement of interpersonal trust1

A new scale for the measurement of interpersonal trust1 1 This mvesbgabon was supported by a grant from the Nabonal Insbtute of Mental Health (MH 11455) Julian B Rotter It seems evident that an adequate measure of individual differences m mterpersonal trust would be of great value for research m the areas of social psychology, personahty, and chnical psychology Social scientists have mvestigated some of the conditions relatmg to mterpersonal trust usmg game theory (Deutsch, 1958, i960, Rapaport & Orwant, 1962, and Scodel, 1962). For the most part these mvestigations have shown that a typical reaction of two strangers m a two-person non-zero-sum game situation mvolving trust produces behavior usually mdicative of competitive rather than cooperative attitudes One might conclude that Americans at least are a highly suspicious and extremely competitive group who would give up many benefits rather than cooperate with someone else. The results of these studies, however, do not seem consistent with a common-sense analysis of our own society From the family unit to big busmess, cooperation seems to mark the everyday behavior of mdividuals and organizations to a far greater degree than would be anticipated from the study of two-person game situations Perhaps this is the result of special reactions to these laboratory http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality Wiley

A new scale for the measurement of interpersonal trust1

Journal of Personality, Volume 35 (4) – Jan 1, 1967

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0022-3506
eISSN
1467-6494
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-6494.1967.tb01454.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 This mvesbgabon was supported by a grant from the Nabonal Insbtute of Mental Health (MH 11455) Julian B Rotter It seems evident that an adequate measure of individual differences m mterpersonal trust would be of great value for research m the areas of social psychology, personahty, and chnical psychology Social scientists have mvestigated some of the conditions relatmg to mterpersonal trust usmg game theory (Deutsch, 1958, i960, Rapaport & Orwant, 1962, and Scodel, 1962). For the most part these mvestigations have shown that a typical reaction of two strangers m a two-person non-zero-sum game situation mvolving trust produces behavior usually mdicative of competitive rather than cooperative attitudes One might conclude that Americans at least are a highly suspicious and extremely competitive group who would give up many benefits rather than cooperate with someone else. The results of these studies, however, do not seem consistent with a common-sense analysis of our own society From the family unit to big busmess, cooperation seems to mark the everyday behavior of mdividuals and organizations to a far greater degree than would be anticipated from the study of two-person game situations Perhaps this is the result of special reactions to these laboratory

Journal

Journal of PersonalityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1967

References

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