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A New Cosmology of Risks and Crises: Time for a Radical Shift in Paradigm and Practice

A New Cosmology of Risks and Crises: Time for a Radical Shift in Paradigm and Practice Our current system for homeland security does not provide the necessary framework to manage the challenges posed by 21st‐Century catastrophic threats. The Federal Response to Hurricane Katrina–Lessons Learned The White House (2006, 52) Crises in the twenty‐first century differ—structurally—from those we had to deal with in the last century. Crises of the twentieth century were traditionally defined and handled as a combination of “threat, urgency, and uncertainty.” Today, crises are better described in terms of a destruction of vital references and a dynamic of systemic implosions. If crises were once a type of severe, dynamic accident, they are now the essential mode of life in our hypercomplex systems. These transboundary crises mark a watershed between mind‐sets and tools of the past, and the new strategic landscape that we are now in. The intellectual and governance challenges are extreme. But looking back is not an option. It is vital to forge new routes into Terrae Incognitae. The goal of this article is to help build (1) a renewed understanding of the emerging challenges we face; and (2) a better strategic response to these systemic dislocations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Policy Research Wiley

A New Cosmology of Risks and Crises: Time for a Radical Shift in Paradigm and Practice

Review of Policy Research , Volume 26 (4) – Jul 1, 2009

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References (61)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 by The Policy Studies Organization
ISSN
1541-132X
eISSN
1541-1338
DOI
10.1111/j.1541-1338.2009.00396.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Our current system for homeland security does not provide the necessary framework to manage the challenges posed by 21st‐Century catastrophic threats. The Federal Response to Hurricane Katrina–Lessons Learned The White House (2006, 52) Crises in the twenty‐first century differ—structurally—from those we had to deal with in the last century. Crises of the twentieth century were traditionally defined and handled as a combination of “threat, urgency, and uncertainty.” Today, crises are better described in terms of a destruction of vital references and a dynamic of systemic implosions. If crises were once a type of severe, dynamic accident, they are now the essential mode of life in our hypercomplex systems. These transboundary crises mark a watershed between mind‐sets and tools of the past, and the new strategic landscape that we are now in. The intellectual and governance challenges are extreme. But looking back is not an option. It is vital to forge new routes into Terrae Incognitae. The goal of this article is to help build (1) a renewed understanding of the emerging challenges we face; and (2) a better strategic response to these systemic dislocations.

Journal

Review of Policy ResearchWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2009

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