A NEGATIVE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MUTATION PLEIOTROPY AND FITNESS EFFECT IN YEAST

A NEGATIVE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MUTATION PLEIOTROPY AND FITNESS EFFECT IN YEAST It is generally thought that random mutations will, on average, reduce an organism's fitness because resulting phenotypic changes are likely to be maladaptive. This relationship leads to the prediction that mutations that alter more phenotypic traits, that is, are more pleiotropic, will impose larger fitness costs than mutations that affect fewer traits. Here we present a systems approach to test this expectation. Previous studies have independently estimated fitness and morphological effects of deleting all nonessential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using datasets generated by these studies, we examined the relationship between the pleiotropic effect of each deletion mutation, measured as the number of morphological traits differing from the parental strain, and its effect on fitness. Pleiotropy explained ∼18% of variation in fitness among the mutants even once we controlled for correlations between morphological traits. This relationship was robust to consideration of other explanatory factors, including the number of protein–protein interactions and the network position of the deleted genes. These results are consistent with pleiotropy having a direct role in affecting fitness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution Wiley

A NEGATIVE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MUTATION PLEIOTROPY AND FITNESS EFFECT IN YEAST

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0014-3820
eISSN
1558-5646
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00109.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is generally thought that random mutations will, on average, reduce an organism's fitness because resulting phenotypic changes are likely to be maladaptive. This relationship leads to the prediction that mutations that alter more phenotypic traits, that is, are more pleiotropic, will impose larger fitness costs than mutations that affect fewer traits. Here we present a systems approach to test this expectation. Previous studies have independently estimated fitness and morphological effects of deleting all nonessential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using datasets generated by these studies, we examined the relationship between the pleiotropic effect of each deletion mutation, measured as the number of morphological traits differing from the parental strain, and its effect on fitness. Pleiotropy explained ∼18% of variation in fitness among the mutants even once we controlled for correlations between morphological traits. This relationship was robust to consideration of other explanatory factors, including the number of protein–protein interactions and the network position of the deleted genes. These results are consistent with pleiotropy having a direct role in affecting fitness.

Journal

EvolutionWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2007

References

  • A global view of pleiotropy and phenotypically derived gene function in yeast
    Dudley, Dudley; Janse, Janse; Tanay, Tanay; Shamir, Shamir; Church, Church
  • Genetic pleiotropy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae quantified by high‐resolution phenotypic profiling
    Ericson, Ericson; Pylvanainen, Pylvanainen; Fernandez‐Ricaud, Fernandez‐Ricaud; Nerman, Nerman; Warringer, Warringer; Blomberg, Blomberg
  • Adaptation and the cost of complexity
    Orr, Orr
  • Modularity and the cost of complexity
    Welch, Welch; Waxman, Waxman

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