A monoclonal antibody recognizing a cell surface antigen coded for by a gene on human chromosome 17

A monoclonal antibody recognizing a cell surface antigen coded for by a gene on human chromosome 17 Summary The monoclonal antibody, H207, raised against the human T‐cell‐derived acute lymphoblastic leukaemia line HSB‐2, recognizes an antigen of apparent molecular weight 125000 which is coded for by the gene, MIC6, on chromosome 17. Assignment was based on the pattern of reactivity with a panel of somatic cell hybrids. In particular, two hybrids containing only human chromosome 17 or a human translocation chromosome t(3;17) (3pter‐3p11::17p11–17qter) respectively bound H207, whilst their revertands did not. The H207 antigen has a general tissue distribution but is not found on B‐cell lines and is lacking from some T‐cell lines. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Human Genetics Wiley

A monoclonal antibody recognizing a cell surface antigen coded for by a gene on human chromosome 17

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-monoclonal-antibody-recognizing-a-cell-surface-antigen-coded-for-by-yWsMop2VRV
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0003-4800
eISSN
1469-1809
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-1809.1982.tb01584.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary The monoclonal antibody, H207, raised against the human T‐cell‐derived acute lymphoblastic leukaemia line HSB‐2, recognizes an antigen of apparent molecular weight 125000 which is coded for by the gene, MIC6, on chromosome 17. Assignment was based on the pattern of reactivity with a panel of somatic cell hybrids. In particular, two hybrids containing only human chromosome 17 or a human translocation chromosome t(3;17) (3pter‐3p11::17p11–17qter) respectively bound H207, whilst their revertands did not. The H207 antigen has a general tissue distribution but is not found on B‐cell lines and is lacking from some T‐cell lines.

Journal

Annals of Human GeneticsWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1982

References

  • Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in humans are located on chromosome 14
    Hobart, Hobart; Rabbits, Rabbits; Goodfellow, Goodfellow; Solomon, Solomon; Chambers, Chambers; Spurr, Spurr; Povey, Povey
  • Fusion between immunoglobulin‐secreting and nonsecreting myeloma cell lines
    Kohler, Kohler; Howe, Howe; Milstein, Milstein
  • A new human cell line (FaDu) from a hypopharyngeal carcinoma
    Rangan, Rangan
  • Quantitative studies of the growth of mouse embryo cells in culture and their development with established lines
    Todaro, Todaro; Green, Green
  • Cytoplasmic transfer of chloramphenicol resistance in human tissue culture cells
    Wallace, Wallace; Bunn, Bunn; Eisenstadt, Eisenstadt

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off