A Measure of Uncertainty: The Nature of Vulnerability and Its Relationship to Malnutrition

A Measure of Uncertainty: The Nature of Vulnerability and Its Relationship to Malnutrition Terms such as ‘vulnerability’ and ‘insecurity’ are used widely in the general nutrition literature as well as in work on humanitarian response. Yet these words are used rather loosely. This paper argues that more clarity in their usage would benefit those seeking a bridge between development and humanitarian problems. Since vulnerability is not fully coincident with malnutrition, poverty or other conventional indices of human deprivation, public action must be based on a better understanding of the nature of crises and human uncertainty beyond physiological and nutritional outcomes. More attention is needed to be paid to the context‐specific nature of risks, the capacity of households to manage such risks and the potential for public action to bolster indigenous capacity through targeted development investments, not just relief. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disasters Wiley

A Measure of Uncertainty: The Nature of Vulnerability and Its Relationship to Malnutrition

Disasters, Volume 23 (4) – Dec 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0361-3666
eISSN
1467-7717
DOI
10.1111/1467-7717.00119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Terms such as ‘vulnerability’ and ‘insecurity’ are used widely in the general nutrition literature as well as in work on humanitarian response. Yet these words are used rather loosely. This paper argues that more clarity in their usage would benefit those seeking a bridge between development and humanitarian problems. Since vulnerability is not fully coincident with malnutrition, poverty or other conventional indices of human deprivation, public action must be based on a better understanding of the nature of crises and human uncertainty beyond physiological and nutritional outcomes. More attention is needed to be paid to the context‐specific nature of risks, the capacity of households to manage such risks and the potential for public action to bolster indigenous capacity through targeted development investments, not just relief.

Journal

DisastersWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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