A mathematical example displaying features of turbulence

A mathematical example displaying features of turbulence introduction Before entering upon the study of the example in question we want to make some introductory remarks about the actual hydrodynamic problems, in particular, about what is known and what is conjectured concerning the future f behavior o the solutions. Consider an incompressible and homogeneous viscous fluid within given material boundaries under given exterior forces. The boundary conditions and the outside forces are assumed to be stationary, i.e. independent o time. For that, it is not necessary that the walls be at rest themselves. f Parts of the material walls may move in a stationary movement provided that the geometrical boundary as a whole stays at rest. An instance is a fluid between two concentric cylinders rotating with prescribed constant velocities or a fluid between two parallel planes which are translated within themselves with given constant velocities. As to the stationarity of the exterior forces we may cite the case of a flow through an infinitely long pipe with a pressure drop (regarded as an outside force). In this case the pressure drop is required to be a given constant independent of time. Each motion of the fluid that is theoretically possible under these conditions satisfies the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Communications on Pure & Applied Mathematics Wiley

A mathematical example displaying features of turbulence

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1948 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0010-3640
eISSN
1097-0312
DOI
10.1002/cpa.3160010401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

introduction Before entering upon the study of the example in question we want to make some introductory remarks about the actual hydrodynamic problems, in particular, about what is known and what is conjectured concerning the future f behavior o the solutions. Consider an incompressible and homogeneous viscous fluid within given material boundaries under given exterior forces. The boundary conditions and the outside forces are assumed to be stationary, i.e. independent o time. For that, it is not necessary that the walls be at rest themselves. f Parts of the material walls may move in a stationary movement provided that the geometrical boundary as a whole stays at rest. An instance is a fluid between two concentric cylinders rotating with prescribed constant velocities or a fluid between two parallel planes which are translated within themselves with given constant velocities. As to the stationarity of the exterior forces we may cite the case of a flow through an infinitely long pipe with a pressure drop (regarded as an outside force). In this case the pressure drop is required to be a given constant independent of time. Each motion of the fluid that is theoretically possible under these conditions satisfies the

Journal

Communications on Pure & Applied MathematicsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1948

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