A marked difference in pathogenesis and immune response induced by different Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes

A marked difference in pathogenesis and immune response induced by different Mycobacterium... SUMMARY In the last decade, an unprecedented genetic diversity has been disclosed among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains found worldwide. However, well‐conserved genotypes seem to prevail in areas with high incidence of tuberculosis. As this may be related to selective advantages, such as advanced mechanisms to circumvent (M. bovis Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG)‐induced) host defence mechanisms, we investigated the influence of strain diversity on the course of experimental disease. Twelve M. tuberculosis strains, representing four major genotype families found worldwide today, and the laboratory strain H37Rv were each used to infect BALB/c mice by direct intratracheal injection. Compared with H37Rv, infections with Beijng strains were characterized by extensive pneumonia, early but ephemeral tumour necrosis factor‐alpha (TNF‐α) and inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) expression, and significantly higher earlier mortality. Conversely, Canetti strains induced limited pneumonia, sustained TNF‐α and iNOS expression in lungs, and almost 100% survival. Strains of the Somali and the Haarlem genotype families displayed less homogeneous, intermediate rates of survival. Previous BCG vaccination protected less effectively against infection with Beijing strains than against the H37Rv strain. In conclusion, genetically different M. tuberculosis strains evoked markedly different immunopathological events. Bacteria with the Beijing genotype, highly prevalent in Asia and the former USSR, elicited a non‐protective immune response in mice and were the most virulent. Future immunological research, particularly on candidate vaccines, should include a broad spectrum of M. tuberculosis genotypes rather than a few laboratory strains. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical & Experimental Immunology Wiley

A marked difference in pathogenesis and immune response induced by different Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-marked-difference-in-pathogenesis-and-immune-response-induced-by-DPHNSjkIhz
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0009-9104
eISSN
1365-2249
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2249.2003.02171.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SUMMARY In the last decade, an unprecedented genetic diversity has been disclosed among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains found worldwide. However, well‐conserved genotypes seem to prevail in areas with high incidence of tuberculosis. As this may be related to selective advantages, such as advanced mechanisms to circumvent (M. bovis Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG)‐induced) host defence mechanisms, we investigated the influence of strain diversity on the course of experimental disease. Twelve M. tuberculosis strains, representing four major genotype families found worldwide today, and the laboratory strain H37Rv were each used to infect BALB/c mice by direct intratracheal injection. Compared with H37Rv, infections with Beijng strains were characterized by extensive pneumonia, early but ephemeral tumour necrosis factor‐alpha (TNF‐α) and inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) expression, and significantly higher earlier mortality. Conversely, Canetti strains induced limited pneumonia, sustained TNF‐α and iNOS expression in lungs, and almost 100% survival. Strains of the Somali and the Haarlem genotype families displayed less homogeneous, intermediate rates of survival. Previous BCG vaccination protected less effectively against infection with Beijing strains than against the H37Rv strain. In conclusion, genetically different M. tuberculosis strains evoked markedly different immunopathological events. Bacteria with the Beijing genotype, highly prevalent in Asia and the former USSR, elicited a non‐protective immune response in mice and were the most virulent. Future immunological research, particularly on candidate vaccines, should include a broad spectrum of M. tuberculosis genotypes rather than a few laboratory strains.

Journal

Clinical & Experimental ImmunologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2003

References

  • Environmental control of tuberculosis
    Nardell, Nardell
  • The immunogenetics of human infectious diseases
    Hill, Hill
  • Killing of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by activated macrophages
    Chan, Chan; Xing, Xing; Magliozzo, Magliozzo; Bloom, Bloom
  • Nitric oxide and macrophage function
    MacMicking, MacMicking; Xie, Xie; Nathan, Nathan
  • Interactions between hormone‐mediated and vaccine mediated immunotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in BALB/c mice
    Hernandez‐Pando, Hernandez‐Pando; Pavon, Pavon; Orozco, Orozco; Rangel, Rangel; Rook, Rook
  • Disseminated tuberculosis in interferon gamma gene‐disrupted mice
    Cooper, Cooper; Dalton, Dalton; Stewart, Stewart; Griffin, Griffin; Russel, Russel; Orme, Orme

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off