A global land primary productivity and phytogeography model

A global land primary productivity and phytogeography model A global primary productivity and phytogeography model is described. The model represents the biochemical processes of photosynthesis and the dependence of gas exchange on stomatal conductance, which in turn depends on temperature and soil moisture. Canopy conductance controls soil water loss by evapotranspiration. The assignment of nitrogen uptake to leaf layers is proportional to irradiance, and respiration and maximum assimilation rates depend on nitrogen uptake and temperature. Total nitrogen uptake is derived from soil carbon and nitrogen and depends on temperature. The long‐term average annual carbon and hydrological budgets dictate canopy leaf area. Although observations constrain soil carbon and nitrogen, the distribution of vegetation types is not specified by an underlying map. Variables simulated by the model are compared to experimental results. These comparisons extend from biochemical processes to the whole canopy, and the comparisons are favorable for both current and elevated CO2 atmospheres. The model is used to simulate the global distributions of leaf area index and annual net primary productivity. These distributions are sufficiently realistic to demonstrate that the model is useful for analyzing vegetation responses to global environmental change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Biogeochemical Cycles Wiley

A global land primary productivity and phytogeography model

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0886-6236
eISSN
1944-9224
D.O.I.
10.1029/95GB02432
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A global primary productivity and phytogeography model is described. The model represents the biochemical processes of photosynthesis and the dependence of gas exchange on stomatal conductance, which in turn depends on temperature and soil moisture. Canopy conductance controls soil water loss by evapotranspiration. The assignment of nitrogen uptake to leaf layers is proportional to irradiance, and respiration and maximum assimilation rates depend on nitrogen uptake and temperature. Total nitrogen uptake is derived from soil carbon and nitrogen and depends on temperature. The long‐term average annual carbon and hydrological budgets dictate canopy leaf area. Although observations constrain soil carbon and nitrogen, the distribution of vegetation types is not specified by an underlying map. Variables simulated by the model are compared to experimental results. These comparisons extend from biochemical processes to the whole canopy, and the comparisons are favorable for both current and elevated CO2 atmospheres. The model is used to simulate the global distributions of leaf area index and annual net primary productivity. These distributions are sufficiently realistic to demonstrate that the model is useful for analyzing vegetation responses to global environmental change.

Journal

Global Biogeochemical CyclesWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

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