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A combined organic‐inorganic sea‐spray source function

A combined organic‐inorganic sea‐spray source function This study presents a novel approach to develop a combined organic‐inorganic sub‐micron sea‐spray source function for inclusion in large‐scale models. It requires wind speed and surface ocean chlorophyll‐a concentration as input parameters. The combined organic‐inorganic source function is implemented in the REMOTE regional climate model and sea‐spray fields are predicted with particular focus on the North East Atlantic. The model predictions using the new source functions compare well with observations of total sea‐spray mass and organic carbon fraction in sea‐spray aerosol. During winter (periods of low oceanic biological activity), sea‐salt dominates the sea‐spray mass while in summer (when biological activity is high), water soluble organic carbon contributes between 60–90% of the submicron sea‐spray mass. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Research Letters Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0094-8276
eISSN
1944-8007
DOI
10.1029/2007GL030331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study presents a novel approach to develop a combined organic‐inorganic sub‐micron sea‐spray source function for inclusion in large‐scale models. It requires wind speed and surface ocean chlorophyll‐a concentration as input parameters. The combined organic‐inorganic source function is implemented in the REMOTE regional climate model and sea‐spray fields are predicted with particular focus on the North East Atlantic. The model predictions using the new source functions compare well with observations of total sea‐spray mass and organic carbon fraction in sea‐spray aerosol. During winter (periods of low oceanic biological activity), sea‐salt dominates the sea‐spray mass while in summer (when biological activity is high), water soluble organic carbon contributes between 60–90% of the submicron sea‐spray mass.

Journal

Geophysical Research LettersWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: ; ;

References