A class of plant glycosyltransferases involved in cellular homeostasis

A class of plant glycosyltransferases involved in cellular homeostasis Many small lipophilic compounds in living cells can be modified by glycosylation. These processes can regulate the bioactivity of the compounds, their intracellular location and their metabolism. The glycosyltransferases involved in biotransformations of small molecules have been grouped into Family 1 of the 69 families that are classified on the basis of substrate recognition and sequence relatedness. In plants, these transfer reactions generally use UDP‐glucose with acceptors that include hormones such as auxins and cytokinins, secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, and foreign compounds including herbicides and pesticides. In mammalian organisms, UDP‐glucuronic acid is typically used in the transfer reactions to endogenous acceptors, such as steroid and thyroid hormones, bile acids and retinoids, and to xenobiotics, including nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs and dietary metabolites. There is widespread interest in this class of enzyme since they are known to function both in the regulation of cellular homeostasis and in detoxification pathways. This review outlines current knowledge of these glycosyltransferases drawing on information gained from studies of plant and mammalian enzymes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The EMBO Journal Wiley

A class of plant glycosyltransferases involved in cellular homeostasis

The EMBO Journal, Volume 23 (15) – Apr 4, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc
ISSN
0261-4189
eISSN
1460-2075
DOI
10.1038/sj.emboj.7600295
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many small lipophilic compounds in living cells can be modified by glycosylation. These processes can regulate the bioactivity of the compounds, their intracellular location and their metabolism. The glycosyltransferases involved in biotransformations of small molecules have been grouped into Family 1 of the 69 families that are classified on the basis of substrate recognition and sequence relatedness. In plants, these transfer reactions generally use UDP‐glucose with acceptors that include hormones such as auxins and cytokinins, secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, and foreign compounds including herbicides and pesticides. In mammalian organisms, UDP‐glucuronic acid is typically used in the transfer reactions to endogenous acceptors, such as steroid and thyroid hormones, bile acids and retinoids, and to xenobiotics, including nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs and dietary metabolites. There is widespread interest in this class of enzyme since they are known to function both in the regulation of cellular homeostasis and in detoxification pathways. This review outlines current knowledge of these glycosyltransferases drawing on information gained from studies of plant and mammalian enzymes.

Journal

The EMBO JournalWiley

Published: Apr 4, 2004

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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    Aherne, SA; O'Brien, NM
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  • The human gene CGT encoding the UDP‐galactose ceramide galactosyl transferase (cerebroside synthase): cloning, characterization, and assignment to human chromosome 4, band q26
    Bosio, A; Binczek, E; Lebeau, MM; Fernald, AA; Stoffel, W
  • Glycoside hydrolases and glycosyltransferases: families and functional modules
    Bourne, Y; Henrissat, B
  • Downregulation of a pathogen‐responsive tobacco UDP‐Glc:phenylpropanoid glucosyltransferase reduces scopoletin glucoside accumulation, enhances oxidative stress, and weakens virus resistance
    Chong, J; Baltz, R; Schmitt, C; Beffa, R; Fritig, B; Saindrenan, P
  • An evolving hierarchical family classification for glycosyltransferases
    Coutinho, PM; Deleury, E; Davies, GJ; Henrissat, B
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    Hirschberg, CB; Robbins, PW; Abeijon, C
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