A biopsychosocial understanding of lower back pain: Content analysis of online information

A biopsychosocial understanding of lower back pain: Content analysis of online information BackgroundLower back pain (LBP) is a leading global burden, causing the greatest global disability of any condition (Vos et al., ). The mean lifetime prevalence of LBP is estimated at 38.9% globally, with increased rates in older populations (Hoy et al., ). Chronic lower back pain (CLBP) forms the largest portion of this social and economic burden, being associated with higher insurance claims (Gore et al., ), increased time off work (Maetzel and Li, ; Steenstra et al., ), higher medical and pharmaceutical costs (Dagenais et al., ), as well as a higher number of comorbidities, such as anxiety, depression and sleep disorders (Gore et al., ). Lower back pain is not a disease entity but rather a symptom of illness, with a complex array of potential biological, psychological and sociological contributing factors (Gatchel et al., ).The biopsychosocial model, made prominent by Gordon Waddell in 1987, is currently the recommended model for understanding and managing LBP and its resulting disability (Waddell, ; Gatchel et al., ; Pincus et al., ; IASP, ). Biological mechanisms are critical in understanding pain and disability (the ‘bio’ in biopsychosocial) (Hancock et al., ); however, the last three decades have seen considerable efforts to further understand the role of psychosocial factors (Hancock et al., ; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pain Wiley

A biopsychosocial understanding of lower back pain: Content analysis of online information

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-biopsychosocial-understanding-of-lower-back-pain-content-analysis-of-K6g0oNIFB4
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®
ISSN
1090-3801
eISSN
1532-2149
D.O.I.
10.1002/ejp.1158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundLower back pain (LBP) is a leading global burden, causing the greatest global disability of any condition (Vos et al., ). The mean lifetime prevalence of LBP is estimated at 38.9% globally, with increased rates in older populations (Hoy et al., ). Chronic lower back pain (CLBP) forms the largest portion of this social and economic burden, being associated with higher insurance claims (Gore et al., ), increased time off work (Maetzel and Li, ; Steenstra et al., ), higher medical and pharmaceutical costs (Dagenais et al., ), as well as a higher number of comorbidities, such as anxiety, depression and sleep disorders (Gore et al., ). Lower back pain is not a disease entity but rather a symptom of illness, with a complex array of potential biological, psychological and sociological contributing factors (Gatchel et al., ).The biopsychosocial model, made prominent by Gordon Waddell in 1987, is currently the recommended model for understanding and managing LBP and its resulting disability (Waddell, ; Gatchel et al., ; Pincus et al., ; IASP, ). Biological mechanisms are critical in understanding pain and disability (the ‘bio’ in biopsychosocial) (Hancock et al., ); however, the last three decades have seen considerable efforts to further understand the role of psychosocial factors (Hancock et al., ;

Journal

European Journal of PainWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial