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Women Poets

Women Poets 398 VICTORIAN POETRY EMILY HARRINGTON Work on Victorian women's poetry from 2015 tends to focus on materiality in a variety of ways. From print culture to ecocriticism to a concern with social justice, work on women's poetry from 2015 seems especially interested in how the poetry circulated, and how it was in conversation not only with the work of male peers, but how it participated in the social, cultural, and natural environment. The most comprehensive treatment of women's poetry to come out in 2015 was Fabienne Moine's Women Poets in the Victorian Era: Cultural Practices and Nature Poetry (Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2015), which offers a welcome, timely focus on a capacious subject. Moine investigates "long-standing beliefs that women shared a particular affinity with the natural world" (p. 2), with an eye to how the poetry variously both reinforces and subverts dominant ideologies about both gender and nature. Her chapters concentrate on certain elements in the natural world, "flowers, gardens, parks, pets, and birds," because they "represent nature under control" and they "engage in politics in unexpected ways" (p. 3). Moine asserts that her concentration on elements of nature rather than on nature as a whole mirrors the women http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
Publisher site
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Abstract

398 VICTORIAN POETRY EMILY HARRINGTON Work on Victorian women's poetry from 2015 tends to focus on materiality in a variety of ways. From print culture to ecocriticism to a concern with social justice, work on women's poetry from 2015 seems especially interested in how the poetry circulated, and how it was in conversation not only with the work of male peers, but how it participated in the social, cultural, and natural environment. The most comprehensive treatment of women's poetry to come out in 2015 was Fabienne Moine's Women Poets in the Victorian Era: Cultural Practices and Nature Poetry (Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2015), which offers a welcome, timely focus on a capacious subject. Moine investigates "long-standing beliefs that women shared a particular affinity with the natural world" (p. 2), with an eye to how the poetry variously both reinforces and subverts dominant ideologies about both gender and nature. Her chapters concentrate on certain elements in the natural world, "flowers, gardens, parks, pets, and birds," because they "represent nature under control" and they "engage in politics in unexpected ways" (p. 3). Moine asserts that her concentration on elements of nature rather than on nature as a whole mirrors the women

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 7, 2016

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