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Using an iPod Touch to Teach Social and Self-Management Skills to an Elementary Student with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

Using an iPod Touch to Teach Social and Self-Management Skills to an Elementary Student with... Abstract: A ten year-old boy exhibiting frequent off-task and disruptive behavior during small group math instruction was taught to use an iPod Touch for video modeling and self-monitoring purposes. A single-subject changing conditions (A-B-BC) design was used to investigate the differential effects of video modeling versus a combination of video modeling and self-monitoring. During the first intervention phase, immediately prior to participating in a math group, the student viewed a 3-minute video in which peers modeled appropriate math group behavior. Video modeling resulted in a significant increase in on-task behavior and decrease in disruptive behavior. However, results showed variability across sessions. For the second intervention phase, the student was taught to self-monitor his behavior during math group. A combination of video modeling and self-monitoring then resulted in a consistent increase in percent of intervals on-task (near 100%), as well as consistently low levels of targeted disruptive behavior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Treatment of Children West Virginia University Press

Using an iPod Touch to Teach Social and Self-Management Skills to an Elementary Student with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

Education and Treatment of Children , Volume 34 (3) – Jul 21, 2011

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1934-8924
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Abstract

Abstract: A ten year-old boy exhibiting frequent off-task and disruptive behavior during small group math instruction was taught to use an iPod Touch for video modeling and self-monitoring purposes. A single-subject changing conditions (A-B-BC) design was used to investigate the differential effects of video modeling versus a combination of video modeling and self-monitoring. During the first intervention phase, immediately prior to participating in a math group, the student viewed a 3-minute video in which peers modeled appropriate math group behavior. Video modeling resulted in a significant increase in on-task behavior and decrease in disruptive behavior. However, results showed variability across sessions. For the second intervention phase, the student was taught to self-monitor his behavior during math group. A combination of video modeling and self-monitoring then resulted in a consistent increase in percent of intervals on-task (near 100%), as well as consistently low levels of targeted disruptive behavior.

Journal

Education and Treatment of ChildrenWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jul 21, 2011

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