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“Two Musics about the Throne of Ilúvatar”: Gnostic and Manichaean Dualism in The Silmarillion

“Two Musics about the Throne of Ilúvatar”: Gnostic and Manichaean Dualism in The Silmarillion : Gnostic and Manichaean Dualism in The Silmarillion n "Ainulindalë," the opening segment of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Silmarillion, Eru, The One, "who in Arda is called Ilúvatar," composes his great symphony with the participation of the Ainur, "the Holy Ones that were the offspring of his thought" (15). Ilúvatar's music is the mighty theme of creation. "Of the theme that I have declared to you," he tells the Ainur, "I will now that ye make in harmony together a Great Music" (15). Then his Ainur respond with their own individual additions to the symphony, creating "endless interchanging melodies woven in harmony that passed beyond hearing into the depths and into the heights" (15). The Ainur are given a vision of the symphony's creation: Arda or Eä (Tolkien's names for the earth and material creation); the Elves, or the First Born; and the Followers, or humanity. When many of the Ainur express their love for Arda, Ilúvatar decrees that "their power should thenceforward be contained and bounded in the world, to be within it for ever, until it is complete, so that they are its life and it is theirs" (20). Perhaps because they are now of this world, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

“Two Musics about the Throne of Ilúvatar”: Gnostic and Manichaean Dualism in The Silmarillion

Tolkien Studies , Volume 12 (1) – Dec 18, 2015

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
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1547-3163
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Abstract

: Gnostic and Manichaean Dualism in The Silmarillion n "Ainulindalë," the opening segment of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Silmarillion, Eru, The One, "who in Arda is called Ilúvatar," composes his great symphony with the participation of the Ainur, "the Holy Ones that were the offspring of his thought" (15). Ilúvatar's music is the mighty theme of creation. "Of the theme that I have declared to you," he tells the Ainur, "I will now that ye make in harmony together a Great Music" (15). Then his Ainur respond with their own individual additions to the symphony, creating "endless interchanging melodies woven in harmony that passed beyond hearing into the depths and into the heights" (15). The Ainur are given a vision of the symphony's creation: Arda or Eä (Tolkien's names for the earth and material creation); the Elves, or the First Born; and the Followers, or humanity. When many of the Ainur express their love for Arda, Ilúvatar decrees that "their power should thenceforward be contained and bounded in the world, to be within it for ever, until it is complete, so that they are its life and it is theirs" (20). Perhaps because they are now of this world,

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Dec 18, 2015

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