Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Tolkien’s Creation of the Impression of Depth

Tolkien’s Creation of the Impression of Depth Michael D. C. Drout, Namiko Hitotsubashi, and Rachel Scavera ne of the most celebrated aesthetic effects of J.R.R. Tolkien’s writings is the “impression of depth” that these works create, the sense that behind the immediate text “there was a coherent, con- sistent, deeply fascinating world about which he had no time (then) to speak” (Shippey, Road 228–29). Tolkien himself identified this quality in works of medieval literature that had “deep roots in the past” that were “made of tales often told before and elsewhere, and of elements that derive from remote times, beyond the vision or awareness of the poet” (M&C 72). He believed that part of the attraction of The Lord of the Rings was “due to glimpses of a large history in the background: an attraction like that of viewing far off an unvisited island, or seeing the towers of a distant city gleaming in a sunset mist” (Letters 333). Previous scholars have made significant progress in explaining the ways that Tolkien creates this impression of depth, attributing it to four major factors: (1) the vast size and intricate detail of the back- ground Tolkien created for his imagined world; (2) the ways he refers to this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Tolkien’s Creation of the Impression of Depth

Tolkien Studies , Volume 11 – Nov 27, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/tolkien-s-creation-of-the-impression-of-depth-tX0dSwoJ0V
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

Michael D. C. Drout, Namiko Hitotsubashi, and Rachel Scavera ne of the most celebrated aesthetic effects of J.R.R. Tolkien’s writings is the “impression of depth” that these works create, the sense that behind the immediate text “there was a coherent, con- sistent, deeply fascinating world about which he had no time (then) to speak” (Shippey, Road 228–29). Tolkien himself identified this quality in works of medieval literature that had “deep roots in the past” that were “made of tales often told before and elsewhere, and of elements that derive from remote times, beyond the vision or awareness of the poet” (M&C 72). He believed that part of the attraction of The Lord of the Rings was “due to glimpses of a large history in the background: an attraction like that of viewing far off an unvisited island, or seeing the towers of a distant city gleaming in a sunset mist” (Letters 333). Previous scholars have made significant progress in explaining the ways that Tolkien creates this impression of depth, attributing it to four major factors: (1) the vast size and intricate detail of the back- ground Tolkien created for his imagined world; (2) the ways he refers to this

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Nov 27, 2014

There are no references for this article.