Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Use of Behavioral Skills Training and In-Situ Training to Teach Children to Solicit Help When Lost: A Preliminary Investigation

The Use of Behavioral Skills Training and In-Situ Training to Teach Children to Solicit Help When... Abstract: Behavioral skills training (BST) was combined with in-situ training to teach young children to solicit help when they become lost from a caregiver at a store. Three children were taught to approach a cashier, tell the cashier their name, and inform the cashier that they are lost. A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of training. One of the three participants successfully met the criterion with the BST + in situ training treatment package alone, and the other two participants required an incentive to meet the criterion. All participants maintained the safety skill at follow-up evaluations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Treatment of Children West Virginia University Press

The Use of Behavioral Skills Training and In-Situ Training to Teach Children to Solicit Help When Lost: A Preliminary Investigation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/the-use-of-behavioral-skills-training-and-in-situ-training-to-teach-iwi5jfM0r9
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1934-8924
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Behavioral skills training (BST) was combined with in-situ training to teach young children to solicit help when they become lost from a caregiver at a store. Three children were taught to approach a cashier, tell the cashier their name, and inform the cashier that they are lost. A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of training. One of the three participants successfully met the criterion with the BST + in situ training treatment package alone, and the other two participants required an incentive to meet the criterion. All participants maintained the safety skill at follow-up evaluations.

Journal

Education and Treatment of ChildrenWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jun 27, 2009

There are no references for this article.