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The Rise and Fall of West Virginia’s Bureau of Negro Welfare and Statistics, 1921–1957

The Rise and Fall of West Virginia’s Bureau of Negro Welfare and Statistics, 1921–1957 Colin E. Reynolds n 1955, Ivanhoe S. Wayne, the director of West Virginia's Bureau of Negro Welfare and Statistics, sued the state auditor for unpaid wages. The state contended that the legislature had not approved Wayne's appointment and that he was entitled neither to the position he claimed nor to the salary prescribed in the West Virginia Code. The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals concurred that the bureau and its director operated at the legislature's pleasure.1 Two years later, not long after Governor William Marland lauded West Virginia's mostly peaceful desegregation of its public schools in his final address to the legislature, a bill to reestablish the provision for the bureau director's salary died in the state senate's finance committee.2 With the bureau slated for quiet termination, Director Bird R. Forney and Field Deputy William L. Spriggs wrote a final report, a shorter and more indignant one than usual. School desegregation, they pointed out, was taking place alongside increasing black unemployment and a dramatic exodus of African Americans from the state. "In the same manner by which the entire people of West Virginia aided and accepted the integration of schools," they wrote, "so should its officials and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies West Virginia University Press

The Rise and Fall of West Virginia’s Bureau of Negro Welfare and Statistics, 1921–1957

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1940-5057
Publisher site
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Abstract

Colin E. Reynolds n 1955, Ivanhoe S. Wayne, the director of West Virginia's Bureau of Negro Welfare and Statistics, sued the state auditor for unpaid wages. The state contended that the legislature had not approved Wayne's appointment and that he was entitled neither to the position he claimed nor to the salary prescribed in the West Virginia Code. The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals concurred that the bureau and its director operated at the legislature's pleasure.1 Two years later, not long after Governor William Marland lauded West Virginia's mostly peaceful desegregation of its public schools in his final address to the legislature, a bill to reestablish the provision for the bureau director's salary died in the state senate's finance committee.2 With the bureau slated for quiet termination, Director Bird R. Forney and Field Deputy William L. Spriggs wrote a final report, a shorter and more indignant one than usual. School desegregation, they pointed out, was taking place alongside increasing black unemployment and a dramatic exodus of African Americans from the state. "In the same manner by which the entire people of West Virginia aided and accepted the integration of schools," they wrote, "so should its officials and

Journal

West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Aug 8, 2015

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