Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelites FLORENCE S. BOOS / 333 FLORENCE S. BOOS The year brought worthwhile articles and scholarly editions to compensate for its scarcity of single-author monographs. Two recent articles on Dante Gabriel Rossetti's poetry offer contrasting psychological and historical approaches. Joseph Bristow's "`He and I': Dante Gabriel Rossetti's Other Man" (VP 39, no. 3) sidesteps more familiar aspects of Rossetti's images of heterosexual frustration to focus on the male personae in poems such as "He and I" (sonnet XCVIII in "The House of Life") who preempt speakers' authority and identity and "solicit, only to betray, the poetspeaker's trust"--figures such as "Willowwood"'s allegorical image of "Love," for example, who weighs down the speaker's "neck with moan of pity and grace" and encircles both lovers' heads in his aureole. Bristow finds other analogous patterns in the looming imagery of "The Burden of Nineveh," "Love"'s denial of fulfilled love in "Love's Nocturne," and the dying speaker's confessions to his priest in "A Last Confession." Readers may find his analysis of Rossetti's figural displacements and processional narcissism convincing enough to warrant searches for unmediated female figures in Rossetti's work (Beatrice sans Virgil? Venus sans Cupid?). In "Punch on Nineveh, Catholics and the P. R. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

The Pre-Raphaelites

Victorian Poetry , Volume 40 (3) – Jan 10, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/the-pre-raphaelites-e4y010ssTe
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

FLORENCE S. BOOS / 333 FLORENCE S. BOOS The year brought worthwhile articles and scholarly editions to compensate for its scarcity of single-author monographs. Two recent articles on Dante Gabriel Rossetti's poetry offer contrasting psychological and historical approaches. Joseph Bristow's "`He and I': Dante Gabriel Rossetti's Other Man" (VP 39, no. 3) sidesteps more familiar aspects of Rossetti's images of heterosexual frustration to focus on the male personae in poems such as "He and I" (sonnet XCVIII in "The House of Life") who preempt speakers' authority and identity and "solicit, only to betray, the poetspeaker's trust"--figures such as "Willowwood"'s allegorical image of "Love," for example, who weighs down the speaker's "neck with moan of pity and grace" and encircles both lovers' heads in his aureole. Bristow finds other analogous patterns in the looming imagery of "The Burden of Nineveh," "Love"'s denial of fulfilled love in "Love's Nocturne," and the dying speaker's confessions to his priest in "A Last Confession." Readers may find his analysis of Rossetti's figural displacements and processional narcissism convincing enough to warrant searches for unmediated female figures in Rossetti's work (Beatrice sans Virgil? Venus sans Cupid?). In "Punch on Nineveh, Catholics and the P. R.

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

There are no references for this article.